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  • 05/15/15--13:28: Die Pfarrwiese

  • Simply adore this panoramic postcard of Rapid Vienna's Pfarrwiese ground. Football in La Belle Époque. 


    There is an air of gentility about the scene. People in their Sunday best attending the game.


    An assortment of headwear and plenty of walking-canes...

    ... and this lady has really made an effort!



    Note the high fences to prevent the ball being booted out of the ground- this was before Jimmy Hogan taught the Austrians to play it on the carpet.

























    Rapid moved to this ground  in the Hütteldorf area of Vienna in 1911. The initial capacity was 4,000,


    This site has some pictures of the ground as it is today. 



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  • 05/17/15--14:23: O ataque dos 100 gols
  • In the 1927 Campeonato Paulista (the version run by APEA) Santos racked up 100 goals in 16 games, an average of  6.25 goals per game. Remarkably this wasn't enough to secure the title. Palestra Itália were champions, having lost 1 game fewer than Santos (and done the double over them).

    
    





    03.05.27

    Santos

    12

    1

    Ypiranga


    Araken [7], Feitiço [2], Hugo, Camarão,Evangelista


    13.05.27

    Santos

    10

    2

    República


    Marino (og), Araken [5] , Feitiço [4]


    22.05.27

    Santos

    4

    2

    Primeiro de Maio


    Feitiço [2], Araken , Omar


    05.06.27

    Santos

    11

    2

    Barra Funda


    Feitiço [4], Araken [2], Evangelista [2], Camarão [2] , Omar


    26.06.27

    Santos

    5

    2

    Portuguesa


    Evangelista, Hugo, Omar, Feitiço [2]


    03.07.27

    Santos

    11

    3

    Americano


    Feitiço [3], Araken [6], Camarão [2]


    31.07.27

    Santos

    9

    3

    São Paulo Alpargatas


    Araken [4], Feitiço [3],Omar [2]


    14.08.27

    Comercial

    3

    4

    Santos


    Feitiço [4]


    21.08.27

    Santos

    10

    1

    Guarani


    Araken [4], Feitiço [3], Camarão [2]. Omar


    29.08.27

    Santos

    4

    1

    Corinthians


     Araken [2], Caio (og), Camarão


    04.09.27

    Corinthians

    3

    8

    Santos


    Camarão [3], Araken [3], Feitiço ,Omar


    27.11.27

    Santos

    4

    1

    Sílex


    Siriri [2], Evangelista, Araken


    22.01.28

    Palestra Itália

    4

    1

    Santos


    Araken


    At the end of the regular season Santos were in 4th place in the league and progressed into a quadrangular play off.


    Second Tournament (Play offs)


    05.02.28

    Guarani  

    2

    4

    Santos


    Siriri [2], Camarão, Evangelista


    26.02.28

    Santos

    1

    0

    Corinthians


    Evangelista


    04.03.28

    Santos

    2

    3

    Palestra Itália


    Siriri , Camarão

    P
    W
    D
    L
    F
    A

    16 

    14  

     

     

    100  

    33  

    The front line, known as  O ataque dos 100 gols (the attack of 100 goals) is generally listed as Omar, Camarão, Feitiço, Araken and  Evangelista. Siriri also deserves to be included. The principal scorers shared the goals as follows:Araken Patusca – 36, Feitiço - 28,  Camarão - 15, Evangelista - 7, Siriri - 6, Omar - 6.   
    Araken
    Araken Patusca (Abraham Patusca da Silveira)
    Santos was in the genes of Abraham Patusca da Silveira. His father was founder and president of the club. Araken made his debut as a 15 year old, scoring 4 goals in his first match. In all he scored 177 goals in 193 matches for Santos. In 1925 he had toured with Paulistano , and wrote a book about  the tour called Os reis do futebol. Unsurprisingly he was top scorer in the Campeonato Paulista of 1927. My calculation of his tally for that season is 36. Araken played 1 game for Brazil, at the 1930 World Cup. 

    Feitiço
    Feitiço (Luís Macedo Matoso)
    The name Feitiço translates to something like 'magic spell'. Wikipedia states that he represented Uruguay but this is incorrect (he did spend some time at Peñarol). He played 1 official international for Brazil. Feitiço got off to a ridiculously good start in the 1927 season, scoring 27 goals in 9 consecutive matches. In the Paulista v Carioca match of  November 13th a remarkable incident occured. Rio were awarded a penalty and the resulting dispute held the game up for 30 minutes. The President of Brazil was in attendance, and even he was unable to persuade the Paulista players to continue. They left the field. Feitiço was then suspended by Santos for his role in this incident. 
    Feitiço was a consistently prolific scorer. In 151 games for Santos he scored 214 goals. He was top scorer in the Campeonato Paulista in 6 seasons.

    Camarão (Aníbal de Andrade Torres)

    Camarão, whose nickname means Shrimp, was a versatile player, a capable half back, outside right or centre forward. He played 270 games for Santos, scoring 150 goals. He later managed the club. 

    Evangelista (João Evangelista Rocha dos Santos), Siriri (Jose Torres) and Omar played their part, sharing 19 goals, but at present I have been unable to unearth much information about them. 





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  • 05/19/15--12:47: 1914


  • The football authorities came in for a great deal of criticism when play continued following the outbreak of war in 1914. There was no reluctance, however, to exploit the potential of the game as a vehicle to promote voluntary enlistment (conscription was not introduced until 1916).
    The above posters appealed to the patriotic inclinations of supporters of Millwall and Tottenham Hotspur.




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  • 05/23/15--00:47: Everton v Newton Heath 1889
  • Dancing and funerals...



    As the 1888-89 season drew to a close the press reveals that clubs were engaged in an intense schedule of friendlies. The programme above is from Newton Heath's first ever visit to Anfield.
    Everton had finished in 8th place in the Football League , Newton Heath had topped the Combination.
    Note that the Everton line up was not as advertised, with the following changes made:
    J Angus (Waugh)
    W Brown (Chadwick)
    R Watson (Parry)
    W Briscoe (Wilson)
    W Wilson (Weir)


    These two well known teams appeared at Anfield last evening it being the first appearance of Newton Heath on the ground. The visitors brought a good team with them and Everton were presented by two or three of their second team. About 3,500 spectators assembled. Williams kicked off, and Everton at once pressed. Farmer and Ross punted into goal-Briscoe sent over to Watson and he parted judiciously to Angus, who scored with a splendid oblique shot, four minutes from the start. Good play by Farmer kept Powell busy, but at length Dobson was beaten by Gotheridge. Ross cleared but Brown put the ball though when he had a good opportunity to pass. The play was kept on the Everton right, which was not to the best advantage. From a foul the ball was taken over the Everton lines for the first time. Parry passing by the whole of the home forwards took the ball down,, and Angus obtained a foul, which Farmer put over the bar. Williams and Jarrett rushed away, but Smalley cleared. Watson was fouled when clear away, but the referee gave a foul. Excellent play by Holt gave Watson and Briscoe possession, they passing to Milward and he shot into Hay's hands, who only partially cleared and Briscoe shot through. Good combined play on the part of the home forwards kept the sphere in the opponents goal, Milward at last give Hays a handful, which he had no difficulty in clearing. A good shot by Owen was diverted by Williams who headed out. Everton then secured a foul near goal, and Watson shot through, but as the ball was wrongly placed it was brought back. Williams started, and Tait and Williams ran down. Williams shot to Smalley's hands, and from some inexplicable cause he allowed the ball to fall and scored for the visitors. Back play by Dobson gave Jarratt a possible chance, but Ross came to the rescue. Hays next had a busy time, as he had to fist out five consecutive shots. Doughty and Gotheridge worked their way down, but found Ross good enough for them, and Angus gave to Brown, who raced away, but nothing came of it. This was directly afterwards followed by a foul in goal and Ross scored the third point for Everton. The home team still maintained the pressure but breaks away by Tait and Gotheridge relieved the monotony. Ross gave a foul in goal, but Holt sent up the field, and Watson forced the pace considerably, and the home forwards again became the aggressive. Score Everton 3 goals; Newton Heath 1 goal, Teams Newton Heath:- Hays (T), goal, Mitchell and Powell, backs Burke, Owen, and Jones, half-backs, Tait, Jarrett, Williams, Doughty, and Gotheridge, forwards. Everton:- Smalley, goal, Dobson, and Ross (captain), Weir, Holt, and Farmer, half-backs, Briscoe, Watson, Milward, Angus, and Brown, forwards.
    The Liverpool Mercury  16.04.89

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  • 05/24/15--00:27: Our Winter Game

  • Summer is here. Time to remember, perhaps, that Association Football is primarily a winter game. Queen's Park started off playing in the summer but on the whole, whether in the Northern or Southern hemisphere it's the winter months that see the bulk of the football action. Those lovely sunlit Cup Finals and sweltering international matches are the exception rather than the rule.
    Thursday 14th January 1926, an FA Cup 3rd round replay at Craven Cottage. Fulham beat Everton 1-0 thanks to a Bert White goal. Snow fell throughout the game, which was, according to newspaper reports, played in semi darkness. Here the groundsman is uncovering the pitch markings.

    We at Before the D are taking our customary May break- be back about June 5th.


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  • 06/04/15--12:50: Prehistory
  • Bell’s Life in London and Sporting Chronicle - 16.01.59

    A brief dip into pre-history here. We know that the Football Association Laws of the game didn't just materialise from the ether, and it was a fair assumption that the desire to formulate a  unifying code arose from a sustained period of conflict between the interested parties.
    Here in 1859 we find the editor of Bell's Life taking a pessimistic view of the situation that the Association would attempt to resolve some 4 years later. 




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  • 06/05/15--10:59: Montes

  • Arturo Montesinos Cebrián , usually called Montes, also known as Tellà, was one of the early greats of Valencia. A prolific centre forward, Montes scored 254 goals in 259 games  for Valencia. His most successful seasons were :

    1922-1923- 49 goals in 46 games
    1924-1925 - 45 in 47 
    1925-1926  - 37 in 30

    He scored the first ever goal at the Estadio de Mestalla.

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  • 06/08/15--01:10: Italy 1912
  • back (L-R):  Angelo Binaschi, Franco Bontadini, Felice Berardo, Giuseppe Milano, Pietro Leone, Renzo De Vecchi, Piero Campelli;
     front (L-R):. Carlo De Marchi, Enrico Sardi, Enea Zuffi, Edoardo Marian 

    Vittorio Pozzo had 4 spells as the manger/coach of the Italian national team. His first period in charge lasted 5 days, being for the duration of Italy's involvement in the 1912 Olympic Games at Stockholm.
    Here are the teams that Pozzo fielded in Italy's 3 games.

    Campelli (Internazionale)
    Campelli
    Campelli
    Binaschi (Pro Vercelli)

    De Vecchi
    De Vecchi
    De Vecchi (Milan C&FC)

    Valle (Pro Vercelli)
    Valle
    De Marchi  (Torino)  *             
    Binaschi
    Binaschi
    Milano (c) (Pro Vercelli)
    Milano (c)
    Milano (c)
    Leone (Pro Vercelli)
    Leone
    Leone
    Zuffi (Torino)
    Bontadini
    Zuffi
    Bontadini (Internazionale)
    Berardo
    Bontadini
    Berardo (Pro Vercelli)
    Sardi
    Berardo
    Sardi (Andrea Doria)
    Barbesino (Casale)
    Barbesino
    Mariani (Genoa C&FC)
    Mariani
    Mariani
     di Popolo 

    (Torino)*



    *di Popolo replaced  De Marchi at half time.

    In the opening game Italy lost 3-2 to Finland in extra time. Italy's goalscorers were Bontadini (1-1:10 min) and Sardi (1-2:25min).
    Italy then beat Sweden 1-0 in the consolation tournament (Bontaini the scorer).

    Pozzo in conference with William Garbutt (centre)

    In the next match they met Jimmy Hogan's Austria and were beaten 5-1, Berardo Italy's scorer. 
    Pozzo's next period as coach of the Azzuri began in the build up to the Paris Olympics 12 years later. 

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  • 06/10/15--11:36: Dubious Histories

  • Let me say at the outset that I have got absolutely nothing against Stoke City or its supporters.
    It's just that their claimed foundation date of 1863 has always struck me as being somewhat spurious. In identifying 1863 as the foundation date historians have contrived to assimilate 2 events separated by 5 years.
    I will further anger Stoke fans by presenting evidence that the club formed as Stoke Ramblers in 1868 ceased to exist in 1908 and an entirely new club was formed in its place,



    1863
    It is an historical fact that football was played in Stoke on February 17th, 1863. It was Shrove Tuesday, and it was reputedly the first time such a spectacle had occured in the town. It was a hybrid  Pre Association version of the game, overseen by Mr John Whitta Thomas, the 37-year-old headmaster of St Peter’s School.
    It was Liverpool born Mr Thomas and The Right Reverend Sir Lovelace Tomlinson Stamer who were responsible for introducing football to The Potteries.
    Rt.Rev. Stamer was an archetypal Good Victorian, founding schools and other charitable organizations (including a hostel for female ex prisoners). He was also keen on promoting sports.
    Accounts published in 1963 suggest that Mr Thomas and other schoolmasters were then responsible for founding a football club.
    1868 
    The notion that a Charterhouse pupil would be apprenticed to a Staffordshire railway company at the age of 13 is beyond belief. 
    In The Book of Football (1906) W.W. Cockbill wrote: Modern football can truly be said to have commenced in 1863, and one of the first clubs that sprang into existence was Stoke, founded by some Old Carthusians – Armand (sic), Bell, Matthews and Philpott.
    Armand was In fact, Henry John Almond. Almond, aged 13 in 1863, did not even feature in Charterhouse football until 1867. It was in 1868 that he began his apprenticeship at North Staffordshire Railway Works.
    The Field reported in September 1868 : A new club has been formed (in Stoke) for the practice of the Association rules under the charge of H.J. Almond, one of the most prominent performers of the Charterhouse School XI last year.
     Note that they were referred to as a new club. There is no reference to them having being in existence for 5 years in any other guise. The football they were playing in 1868 was still of the most casual nature. 
    The connection between 1863 and Almond's club of 1868 is Mr Thomas, who was Stoke Ramblers' first secretary. 
    I am not aware of any documentary evidence that John Whitta Thomas had maintained a regular football club in the town between 1863 and 1868.

    Stoke dropped the Ramblers from their name and were founding members of the Football League in 1888. 


    1908
    On 27.03.08 6,000 people saw Stoke lose 1-0 to Leicester Fosse at The Victoria Ground. This was the last League match for the original Stoke club. They finished 10th in Division 2 but resigned from the League due to financial problems. 
    An extraordinary meeting on 11.09.08 unanimously carried the proposal that the club be wound up. 
    Contemporary press reports consistently refer to the club that was subsequently founded as the new organization. There are also references to the two clubs as separate entities- for example, when the directors of the 'old' club donated £50 to the 'new' club. 
    Also the 'new' club would have commenced their Birmingham and District League season before the winding up of the 'old' club was proposed on 11.09.08.
    Incidentally, the XI who had faced Fosse in April were all at different clubs when September came around:



    September 1908
    Played for ‘new’ Stoke?
    Arthur Box
    Birmingham 

    Charlie Burgess
    Manchester City 

    Billy Cope
    Oldham Athletic 

    George Baddeley

    West Bromwich Albion

    Louis Williams
    Bradford City 

    Albert Sturgess
    Sheffield United 

    Billy Williamson
    Crewe Alexandra
    1911
    Freddie Brown 
    West Bromwich Albion

    Jackie Chalmers
    Bristol Rovers 

    Syd Owen
    Burslem Port Vale/ Leicester Fosse 
    1912
    Amos Baddeley 
    Blackpool
    1909



    Nottingham Evening Post - 30.07.08



    Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - 18.07.08


    Nottingham Evening Post- 04.09.08

    Press reports form 1908 consistently make it clear that the Stoke FC formed that year after the collapse of 'the old club' was considered to be a separate entity. 





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    William Pickford was 17 years old when he watched an Association game between  Blackburn District and Bolton. Formerly a Rugby enthusiast he was captivated by the Asociation game. having relocated from lancashire to Hampshire he was active in local football administration and also wrote on the  game for the local press. 
    Mr Pickford took to refereeing when his playing days with Bournemouth Rovers came to an end.
    He was one of the 79 attendees of the March 1893 meeting at which The FA formed the first referees’ society. C.W. Alcock was President and F.J Wall Chairman.
    In 1895 the society produced the first edition of The Referees’ Chart, a set of guidelines that elabourated on The Laws of the Game.
    Mr Pickford played a leading role in the production of this document.
    He held several prominent positions in football; 
    He was member of the council of the Football Association, a Vice-President of FIFA and a member of the International Football Association Board. In 1937 he  became president of the Football Association.
    How to Referee appeared in 1906. It comnbines an analydis of the Laws of the Game with an outline of the psychological challenges of match control. 
    Free Britons have queer ways of enjoying themselves is taken from Mr Pickford's comment advising referees not to be perturbed by the passionate noise of the crowd.



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  • 06/13/15--11:10: Managers
  • Here are some successful managers pictured during their careers as players.


    The player in the centre of the back row of this photograph is Helenio Herrera. The team is Casablanca Roches Noires (1929).  As a manager in the 1950s and 60s he won La Liga 4 times, Serie A 3 times, The Fairs Cup twice, the European Cup twice, the Copa Del Rey twice and the Coppa Italia once. 


    The legendary William Shankly of Preston North End. He guided Liverpool to 3 League titles, 2 FA Cups and a UEFA Cup. These figures mean nothing. His solid proletarian ethics and his philosophy of football cemented his place in the folklore of the game.

    Guttmann Béla - Known outside Hungary as Bela Guttmann- the silk shirted dancing master who played at the heart of the great Hakoah Vienna side later won titles as a manager in Hungary, Brazil and Portugal ( he also managed clubs in the Netherlands, Romania, Switzerland, Austria, Uruguay, Argentina, Italy and Greece!) . He won the European Cup twice with Benfica, and his parting curse on that club remains potent to this day. 


    Sir Matt Busby built 2 great sides at Manchester United, winning the European Cup, 5 League titles and 2 FA Cups. In his playing days he represented Liverpool and Manchester City.




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  • 06/16/15--14:16: Walter Bennett



  • It was a different world...
    Footballers were paid decently enough, but for most working class pros the end of their playing days  meant a return to industry. Some made it as coaches and others were set up as publicans, but they were in the minority. In April 1908 Cocky Bennett was killed at  Denaby Main Colliery. 18 months earlier he had been playing for Bristol City in the First Division. 
    Bennett had made 234 appearances for Sheffield United , scoring 72 goals. He scored 22 goals in 49 matches for Bristol City, helping them to win the Second Division title in 1905-06.


    League
    FA Cup
    1896–97
    Runners up

    1897–98
    Champions

    1898–99


    1899–1900
    Runners up
    Winners
    1900–01

    Runners up
    1901–02

    Winners*

    *Bennett played in the first match but missed the replay due to injury

    Bennett represented England twice in 1901.


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    1903
    In Quilmes, Buenos Aires, during the latter part of the 1890s there was a group of footballers who called themselves El Relámpago (Lightning). The local football club was Quilmes Atlético Club, founded in 1887 by English residents. As native born Argentinians the Colegio Nacional students who played for El Relámpago were excluded from Quilmes Atlético Club.
     Quilmes Atlético Club, like many other clubs in Argentina, remained the preserve of European incomers. The language of Argentine football was English, and so was the style. 
    On December 1st, 1899 the boys who had made up El Relámpago founded Club Argentino de Quilmes. The act of foundation  records that the name Club Atlético Argentino de Quilmes , chosen as a tribute to the Motherland and our People, was proclaimed unanimously.
    Argentino de Quilmes was the first club to be formed by native born Argentinians, and as such was the club in which  The notion of fútbol criollo as a distinct style and philosophy of play first found its expression.



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    Jack Bell (Everton) -  chairman of the AFU

    John Cameron (Everton)- president of the AFU

    Now look here, how would any man in business like to have his wages reduced by 25% if his employers could well afford better terms?- John Cameron.

    The first Trade Union connected with Association football was founded in February 1898. Given that football was now becoming the Peoples' Game and the majority of players were from proletarian backgrounds, it seems a shame that the AFU wasn't exactly steeped in socialist principles. 
    It is often reported that the catalyst for the foundation of the AFU was the introduction of the maximum wage in 1893. However, the maximum wage was proposed in 1893 but did not come into force until 1901. Prominent member Jack Devey (Aston Villa) stated that the AFU were not concerning themselves with wages, and president, John Cameron said that the main objective was to enable players to negotiate transfers, rather than being excluded from the process completely. This was a response to the retain and transfer system, introduced in 1893, that effectively gave the clubs complete control over players, even if they were 'out of contract'. The AFU failed in their attempts to challenge this system, which, incredibly, remained in force until 1963.


    By 1901 the situation for professional players had actually worsened. The Football League had introduced a maximum wage and outlawed the payment of bonuses. The maximum wage was fixed at £4 per week- a higher sum than most professionals could hope to earn in the League. On this front the AFU was more of a vehicle for the concerns of star players and Scottish imports who, in a free market, would be commanding wages more in the region of £10 a week. 

    In fact 1901 saw the dissolution of the AFU as many of it's more active members had left League clubs to seek employment in the Southern League (which had no wage cap and at the time didn't recognise the retain and transfer system).
    Neither the Football Association nor the Football League recognized the Association Footballers' Union.



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  • 06/23/15--11:54: Gentlemen and Players

  • I have been lucky enough to play against nearly all the League teams, and have, therefore, met many professionals. They are a very nice set of men, not only to meet on the football field, but off it. It is quite an exceptional thing to find foul play amongst the leading professional clubs. When you meet second-class professional the case may be different; but the first-class professional rarely descends to shady tricks, and plays the game in the spirit in which it ought to be played.
    G.O. Smith 1896



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    Schlosser Imre (Imre Schlosser-Lakatos)

    A 21 year international career is in itself a remarkable achievement (in the pre 1937 era only Billy Meredith and Billy McCracken exceeded Schlosser).Only Anel Romano of Uruguay (69) played in more internationals during this era.  Schlosser's 59 international goals in 68 matches gives him a strike rate amongst the best ever (0.87 per match).



    Date




    Venue
    Schlosser
    Total
    1        

     

    07.10.06
    Bohemia
    4
    4
    Hungary
    Praguea



    2        

     

    04.11.06
    Hungary
    3
    1
    Austria
    Budapestb

    1
    1
    3        

     

    07.04.07
    Hungary
    5
    2
    Bohemia
    Budapestb

    4        

     

    05.05.07
    Austria
    3
    1
    Hungary
    Vienna c


    5        

     

    06.10.07
    Bohemia
    5
    3
    Hungary
    Praguea

    6        

     

    03.11.07
    Hungary
    4
    1
    Austria
    Budapestb

    7        

     

    05.04.08
    Hungary
    5
    2
    Bohemia
    Budapestb
    2
    3
    8        

     

    03.05.08
    Austria
    4
    0
    Hungary
    Vienna d


    9        

     

    10.06.08
    Hungary
    0
    7
    England
    Budapestb

    10    

     

    01.11.08
    Hungary
    5
    3
    Austria
    Budapestb
    2*
    5
    11    

     

    04.04.09
    Hungary
    3
    3
    Germany
    Budapestb
    1
    6
    12    

     

    02.05.09
    Austria
    3
    4
    Hungary
    Viennae

    3
    9
    13    

     

    30.05.09
    Hungary
    1
    1
    Austria
    Budapestb

    14    

     

    31.05.09
    Hungary
    2
    8
    England
    Budapestb
    1
    10
    15    

     

    07.11.09
    Hungary
    2
    2
    Austria
    Budapestb
    2
    12
    16    

     

    01.05.10
    Austria
    2
    1
    Hungary
    Vienna d

    17    

     

    26.05.10
    Hungary
    6
    1
    Italy
    Budapestb
    2
    14
    18    

     

    06.11.10
    Hungary
    3
    0
    Austria
    Budapestb

    19    

     

    01.01.11
    France
    0
    3
    Hungary
    Paris f
    3
    17
    20    

     

    06.01.11
    Italy
    0
    1
    Hungary
    Milan g
    1
    18
    21    

     

    08.01.11
    Switzerland
    2
    0
    Hungary
    Zurich h

    22    

     

    07.05.11
    Austria
    3
    1
    Hungary
    Vienna d

    23    

     

    29.10.11
    Hungary
    9
    0
    Switzerland
    Budapestb
    6
    24
    24    

     

    05.11.11
    Hungary
    2
    0
    Austria
    Vienna d

    25
    25    

     

    17.12.11
    Germany
    1
    4
    Hungary
    Munichj
    2
    26
    26    

     

    14.04.12
    Hungary
    4
    4
    Germany
    Budapesti
    1
    27
    27    

     

    05.05.12
    Austria
    1
    1
    Hungary
    Vienna d

    28    

     

    20.06.12
    Sweden
    2
    2
    Hungary
    Gothenburgk

    29    

     

    23.06.12
    Norway
    0
    6
    Hungary
    OsloL
    2
    29
    30    

     

    30.06.12
    Hungary
    0
    7
    England Am.
    Stockholmm

    31    

     

    03.07.12
    Hungary
    3
    1
    Germany
    Solnan
    3
    32
    32    

     

    05.07.12
    Hungary
    3
    0
    Austria
    Solna n
    1
    33
    33    

     

    12.07.12
    Russia
    0
    9
    Hungary
    Moscowo
    2
    35
    34    

     

    14.07.12
    Russia
    0
    12
    Hungary
    Moscowo
    5
    40
    35    

     

    03.11.12
    Hungary
    4
    0
    Austria
    Budapesti
    2
    42
    36    

     

    27.04.13
    Austria
    1
    4
    Hungary
    Viennap

    37    

     

    18.05.13
    Hungary
    2
    0
    Sweden
    Budapesti
    1
    43
    38    

     

    26.10.13
    Hungary
    4
    3
    Austria
    BudapestQ

    39    

     

    31.05.14
    Hungary
    5
    1
    France
    Budapesti

    40    

     

    19.06.14
    Sweden
    1
    5
    Hungary
    Solna n
    1
    44
    41    

     

    21.06.14
    Sweden
    1
    1
    Hungary
    Solna n
    1
    45
    42    

     

    04.10.14
    Hungary
    2
    2
    Austria
    Budapesti
    1
    46
    43    

     

    08.11.14
    Austria
    1
    2
    Hungary
    Viennap

    44    

     

    05.05.15
    Hungary
    2
    5
    Austria
    BudapestQ

    45    

     

    30.05.15
    Austria
    1
    2
    Hungary
    Viennap
    1
    47
    46    

     

    03.10.15
    Austria
    4
    2
    Hungary
    Viennap
    1
    48
    47    

     

    07.11.15
    Hungary
    6
    2
    Austria
    Budapesti

    48    

     

    04.06.16
    Hungary
    2
    1
    Austria
    BudapestQ
    1
    49
    49    

     

    01.10.16
    Hungary
    2
    3
    Austria
    Budapesti

    50    

     

    05.11.16
    Austria
    3
    3
    Hungary
    Viennap
    1
    50
    51    

     

    06.05.17
    Austria
    1
    1
    Hungary
    Viennap
    1
    51
    52    

     

    03.06.17
    Hungary
    6
    2
    Austria
    BudapestQ
    2
    53
    53    

     

    15.07.17
    Austria
    1
    4
    Hungary
    Viennap
    1
    54
    54    

     

    07.10.17
    Hungary
    2
    1
    Austria
    Budapesti

    55    

     

    04.11.17
    Austria
    1
    2
    Hungary
    Viennap

    56    

     

    14.04.18
    Hungary
    2
    0
    Austria
    BudapestQ
    1
    55
    57    

     

    12.05.18
    Hungary
    2
    1
    Switzerland
    BudapestQ
    1
    56
    58    

     

    02.06.18
    Austria
    0
    2
    Hungary
    Viennap
    1
    57
    59    

     

    06.10.18
    Austria
    0
    3
    Hungary
    Viennap

    60    

     

    09.11.19
    Hungary
    3
    2
    Austria
    BudapestQ

    61    

     

    24.10.20
    Germany
    1
    0
    Hungary
    Berlin R

    62    

     

    24.04.21
    Austria
    4
    1
    Hungary
    Vienna S

    63    

     

    05.06.21
    Hungary
    3
    0
    Germany
    BudapestQ
    1
    58
    64    

     

    06.11.21
    Hungary
    4
    2
    Sweden
    Budapesti
    1
    59
    65    

     

    18.12.21
    Hungary
    1
    0
    Poland
    BudapestQ

    66    

     

    06.06.26
    Hungary
    2
    1
    Czechoslovakia
    Budapesti

    67    

     

    14.11.26
    Hungary
    3
    1
    Sweden
    Budapesti

    68    

     

    10.04.27
    Austria
    6
    0
    Hungary
    Vienna d


    Venues:

    a Slavia Stadion
    g Arena Civica
    n , Råsunda

    bMillenáris Sportpálya

    hHardau Velodrome
    o  Sokolniki Sports Club

    c Rapid Platz

    i Üllői úti Stadion
    pWAC Platz

    d Hohe Warte

    j MTV 79 Platz
    Q Hungária körúti stadion

    e Cricketer Platz

    k Valhalla Idrottsplats

    RGrunewaldstadion

    fStade du Cercle Athlétique de Paris

    Frogner
    s Simmeringer

    M Olympiastadion


    * Not all sources credit Schlosser with goal 5.
    Games 30, 31 and 32 were at The Olympic Games.
     Goals 8 & 9 (game 12) were penalties.

    When Schlosser scored his goals:



















































































































    5

    10

    15

    20

    25

    30

    35

    40

    45


    50

    55

    60

    65

    70

    75

    80

    85

    90







    0 0


    1916

    Winners
    Entrants
    Top Scorer
    Player of Tournament
    Hosts
    1916

    Uruguay

    Argentina
    Brazil
    Chile
    Uruguay
    Isabelino Gradín (Uru) 3
    Isabelino Gradín (Uru)
    Argentina


    1917

    Winners
    Entrants
    Top Scorer
    Player of Tournament
    Hosts
    1917

    Uruguay

    Argentina
    Brazil
    Chile
    Uruguay
    Ángel Romano (Uru) 4
    Hector Scarone (Uru)
    Uruguay

    1919

    Winners
    Entrants
    Top Scorer
    Player of Tournament
    Hosts
    1919

    Brazil

    Argentina
    Brazil
    Chile
    Uruguay
    Arthur Friedenreich & Neco (Br) 4
    Arthur Friedenreich (Br)
    Brazil


    1920

    Winners
    Entrants
    Top Scorer
    Player of Tournament
    Hosts
    1920

    Uruguay

    Argentina
    Brazil
    Chile
    Uruguay
    Jose Perez & Ángel Romano (Uru) 3
    José Piendibene (Uru)
    Chile
    Noteworthy for a 6-0 win for Uruguay over Brazil. Uruguay won all 3 of their matches, scoring 9 goals in the process.

    1921

    Winners
    Entrants
    Top Scorer
    Player of Tournament
    Hosts
    1921

    Argentina

    Argentina
    Brazil
    Paraguay
    Uruguay
    Julio Libonatti (Arg)  3
    Américo Tesoriere (Arg)
    Argentina
    Paraguay’s first appearance. Their opening match, against Uruguay, was only their 7th international. They beat the champions 2-1.
    Withdrew: Chile

    1922

    Winners
    Entrants
    Top Scorer
    Player of Tournament
    Hosts
    1922

    Brazil

    Argentina
    Brazil
    Chile
    Paraguay
    Uruguay

    Julio Francia (Arg) 4
    Agostinho Fortes Filho (Br)
    Brazil
    Moved from planned venue Chile in order to mark 100 years of Brazilian independence. All the matches were played at Estadio das Laranjeiras. At the conclusion of the tournament Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay were tied on 5 points- Brazil only having 1 win to the other countries’ 2.  Uruguay then withdrew, leaving Brazil and Paraguay to play off for the championship. Brazil won 3-0.
    Paraguay’s 10 outfield players had walked off the pitch in the 79th minute of their defeat to Argentina, but this went unpunished by the authorities.


    1923

    Winners
    Entrants
    Top Scorer
    Player of Tournament
    Hosts
    1923

    Uruguay

    Argentina
    Brazil
    Paraguay
    Uruguay
    Pedro Petrone (Uru) & Vicente Aguirre (Arg) 3
    José Nasazzi (Uru)
    Uruguay
    Used as a qualifying tournament for the 1924 Olympics. All matches were played at Estadio Gran Parque Central. The tournament was decided in the final match played, Uruguay beating Argentina 2-0.
    Withdrew: Chile                              

    1924

    Winners
    Entrants
    Top Scorer
    Player of Tournament
    Hosts
    1924

    Uruguay

    Argentina
    Chile
    Paraguay
    Uruguay
    Pedro Petrone (Uru) 4
    Pedro Petrone (Uru)
    Uruguay
    Paraguay declined the offer to host the tournament. It was instead played at Estadio Gran Parque Central in honour of Uruguay’s triumph at the 1924 Olympics.
    Withdrew: Brazil                                              

    1925

    Winners
    Entrants
    Top Scorer
    Player of Tournament
    Hosts
    1925               

    Argentina

    Argentina
    Brazil
    Paraguay
    Manuel Seoane (Arg) 6
    Manuel Seoane (Arg)
    Argentina
    Only 3 teams competed. Chile withdrew in response to their poor showing in 1924 when they lost all 3 matches and conceded 10 goals, Uruguay because of splits in the governing bodies.. Note the unusual presence of a black player in the Argentina side- Alejandro De Los Santos of El Porvenir- the first black man to represent Argentina.
    Withdrew: Chile, Uruguay.          
                   
    1926

    Winners
    Entrants
    Top Scorer
    Player of Tournament
    Hosts
    1926               

    Uruguay

    Argentina
    Bolivia
    Chile
    Paraguay
    Uruguay
    David Arellano (Chile) 7
    Jose Andrade (Uru)
    Chile
    Bolivia entered for the first time and shipped 24 goals in 4 matches, although it was Paraguay who suffered the worst loss- 8-0 to Argentina.
    Withdrew: Brazil                                                              
    1927

    Winners
    Entrants
    Top Scorer
    Player of Tournament
    Hosts
    1927

    Argentina

    Argentina
    Bolivia
    Peru
    Uruguay
    5 players scored 3 goals.
    Manuel Seoane (Arg)
    Peru
    The tournament served as a qualifier for the 1928 Olympics. Peru participated for the first time.
    37 goals were scored (6.17 per match) with both Argentina and Uruguay scoring 15 goals.
    Withdrew: Brazil, Chile, Paraguay        
                                                        

    1929

    Winners

    Entrants

    Top Scorer

    Player of Tournament

    Hosts

    1929

    Argentina

    Argentina Paraguay

    Peru

    Uruguay

    Aurelio González (Par) 5

    Manuel Nolo Ferreira (Arg)

    Argentina

    No contest was held in 1928 due to the absence of Argentina, Chile and Uruguay at the Olympics.

    Withdrew: Bolivia, Brazil, Chile        
                                                              

    1935

    Winners
    Entrants
    Top Scorer
    Player of Tournament
    Hosts
    1935

    Uruguay

    Argentina
    Chile
    Peru
    Uruguay
    Herminio Masantonio (Arg) 4
    José Nasazzi (Uru)
    Peru
    Relations between Argentina and Uruguay had effectively been severed following the 1930 World Cup and the 2 sides didn’t meet for 2 years. The resumption of the South American Championship also served as a qualifying competition for the 1936 Olympics (although ultimately neither Argentina nor Uruguay travelled to Berlin for financial reasons).
    It was an additional tournament- no trophy was awarded.
    Withdrew: Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay      
                                                       
    1937

    Winners
    Entrants
    Top Scorer
    Player of Tournament
    Hosts
    1937               

    Argentina

    Argentina
    Brazil
    Chile
    Paraguay
    Peru
    Uruguay
    Raúl Toro (Chile) 7
    Vicente de la Mata (Arg)
    Argentina
    Brazil returned after a 4 tournament / 12 year absence. They were defeated by Argentina in a play-off.  2 extra time goals won it for Argentina, who had previously beaten Brazil earlier in the tournament.
    69 goals were scored (4.31 per match).

    Withdrew: Bolivia, Colombia.                                     
                   





    0 0
  • 07/04/15--14:07: Goodison Park
  • 'The first purpose built football stadium in England'- Goodison Park opened on 24 August 1892. FA dignitaries Lord Kinnaird and Frederick Wall were present, but strangely there was no football match- a 12,000 crowd saw athletics followed music and a fireworks display. Everton's first game at the new stadium was on 1st September 1892 when they beat Bolton Wanderers  4-2. 2,000 less people were present than had been for the fireworks!. The first Everton XI to take to the pitch at the new stadium was:
    Jardine, Howarth, Dewar, Boyle, Holt, Robertson, Latta, Maxwell, Chadwick, Millward.
    The same line up faced  Nottingham Forest in the opening League fixture on September 3rd (a 2-2 draw).
    Out of Doors magazine commented in  October 1892:
    No single picture could take in the entire scene the ground presents, it is so magnificently large, for it rivals the greater American baseball pitches. On three sides of the field of play there are tall covered stands, and on the fourth side the ground has been so well banked up with thousands of loads of cinders that a complete view of the game can be had from any portion.it appears to be one of the finest and most complete grounds in the kingdom...


    
    

    The illustration above shows the friendly between Everton and Heart of Midlothian on November 12th 1892. The match ended in a 2-0 victory for the hosts. The drawing shows the Gwladys Street End and Goodison Road - the old St Luke's Church  is in the background. The corner flags look like they belong on a crazy golf course. 

    Liverpool Mercury -  21.11.92
    
    




    0 0



    A look at the winners of the United States' National Challenge Cup in the early 1930s reveals the following interesting sequence:

    1930
    The Fall River Marksmen of the Atlantic Coast League defeated Bruell Insurance of Cleveland over 2 legs.  At New York Polo Grounds (30.03.30) Marksmen won  7-2. Jimmy McAuley (3),Werner Nilsen (3) and Alex McNab were the scorers. Luna Park, Cleveland hosted the second leg on 06.04.30- , Marksmen winning  2-1, with goals by McNab and Bob McAuley.



    1931
    Fall River Marksmen don't appear in the league tables for the 1931 season, as the club had relocated to New York and had become the New York Yankees. However, for the National Challenge Cup they played under the name of Fall River Marksmen, having entered the tournament before the move to New York.
    In the final the Marksmen/Yankees faced Chicago Bricklayers.
    The 1st leg at the Polo Grounds (05.04.31) finished 6-2, Bert Patenaude scoring 5 goals and Bill McPherson 1.  
    Bizarrely the rules of the contest meant that a 1-1 draw in the 2nd match (played at Chicago's Mills Stadium 12.04.31) meant that a 3rd match was required.  (Billy Gonsalves scored the Fall River goal). 
    The deciding game at Sparta Stadium ,Chicago, was played on 19.04.31. Alex McNab had broken his arm in a midweek friendly and Fall River played the entire match with 10 men , winning 2-0 with goals from Patenaude and Gordon Burness.




    1932
    The New York Yankees relocated after just one season, becoming The New Bedford Whalers. Under their new guise they again reached the final of the National Challenge Cup, where they defeated Stix, Baer & Fuller of St. Louis.
    Both games were played at Sportsman's Park, St. Louis. On 26.03.32  the result was a 3-3 draw (some discrepancies exist over the identities of the scorers). The following week Whalers won 5-2.White, Nilsen, Gonsalves, McPherson and Florie scored the goals.


    Marksmen 1930

    1st leg

    2nd leg

    Johnny Reder

    Johnny Reder

    Bob McAuley

    Charlie McGill

    McArthur

    Bob McAuley

    Bill McPherson

    Bill McPherson

    Priestley

    Priestley

    Bobby Ballantyne

    Bobby Ballantyne

    Alex McNab

    Alex McNab

    Billy Gonsalves

    Billy Gonsalves

    Werner Nilsen (Gavin)

    Werner Nilsen

    Jimmy McAuley

    Bert Patenaude

    James Tec White
    James Tec White

    Marksmen (New York Yankees) 1931

    1st leg

    2nd leg

    3rd leg

    Johnny Reder

    unchanged

    Johnny Reder

    Charlie McGill

    Charlie McGill

    Augusto John Rebello

    Augusto John Rebello
    Bill McPherson

    Bill McPherson

    Johnny Caldwell

    Johnny Caldwell

    Bobby Ballantyne

    Bobby Ballantyne

    Alex McNab


    Werner Nilsen

    James Tec White
    Bert Patenaude

    Bert Patenaude

    Billy Gonsalves

    Billy Gonsalves

    James Tec White

    Gordon Burness


    New Bedford Whalers 1932

    1st leg

    2nd leg

    Watson

    unchanged

    Augusto John Rebello
    McMillen

    Johnny Caldwell

    Montgomerie

    Bill McPherson

    Tom Florie

    Billy Gonsalves

    Werner Nilsen

    James Tec White
    Alex McNab




    Some players of note:-
    Johnny Reder
     Born in Poland, Reder also played baseball for Boston Red Sox.

    Bob McAuley

    Born in Glasgow, raised in Montreal. McAuley later played for Glasgow rangers, Chelsea and Cardiff City and won 2 caps for Scotland in 1931.

    Bill McPherson

    Began his career with his hometown club Greenock Morton and joined Beith before emigrating to the USA,

    Bobby Ballantyne

    Another Glasweigian , he later returned to Scotland and played for Aberdeen and St Johnstone.

    Alex McNab

    Another nastive of Greenock who played for Greenock Morton. Represented scotland twice in 1921. Went to the states in 1924 

    Werner “Scotty” Nilsen

    In a team of many Scots it was Norweigian Nilsen who was known as Scotty. He moved to the USA as a 19 year old. Represented the USA at the 1934 World Cup. Was also a male model!



    Billy Gonsalves

    Adelino Gonçalves was born in Rhode Island, his parents were from Madeira . Played for the USA in the 1930 and 1934 World Cups. His  professional career spanned 25 years.

    Jimmy McAuley

    An Irishman who had played for Ards before moving to the USA where he first played for Philedelphia Celtic. 

    James Tec White

    Another Scotsman, White played for Albion Rovers, Maidstone united and motherwell before Sam Mark persuaded him to join Fall River Marksmaen.

    Charlie McGill

    McGill had previously played for Third Lanark. 

    Bert Patenaude

    A native of Fall River, he played for the USA at the 1930 World Cup. 

    Tom Florie

    Played for the USA in the 1930 and 1934 World Cups.



    0 0


    The Laws of the Game
    Shortly after the Football Association formulated The Laws of the Game in 1863 they were published by John Lillywhite of Seymour Street in a booklet that cost a shilling and sixpence.


    Kicking the ball- simply explained with the aid of annotated diagrams(!)

    Beeton's Football
    In 1866 cricket writer Frederick Wood produced Beeton's Football. The Beeton's series covered a wide range of subjects, and was an offshoot of the legendary Beeton's Book of Household Management.
    The book contained hints on diet and preparation (avoid foods and habits which are injurious to the wind and general powers of endurance), and illustrated guidance on how to best kick the ball. 
    the 98 page octavo book cost a shilling .

    Sporting Life 07.02.66


    Routledge's Handbook of Football
    The next publisher to respond to the growing popularity of football was G. Routledge and Sons. Their 60 page Handbook of Football appeared in 1867.


    The quality of the advice, which might, to modern ears, sound quite naive, is indicative of the rudimentary state of the game at this point in time: 
    For excellent fellows at football the prettiest costume is a coloured velvet cap with tassel, a tight striped jersey and white flannel trousers. It is a good plan, if it can be previously so arranged, to have one side with striped jerseys of one colour, say red, and the other with another, say blue. This prevents confusion and wild attempts to run after and wrest the ball from your neighbour. 
    If you have the good fortune to own a copy you could expect to get £500 for it at auction. 


    The Football Annual


    The Lillywhite family had been publishing cricket books since 1848. 
    The first John Lilywhite's Football Annual appeared in 1868. It was edited by  Charles Alcock, and was called The Football Annual from 1869 to 1908 .  The annuals are exceedingly rare and are commonly known as Charles Alcock's Football Annual. 
    'Published with the sanction of the Football Association', the annual was a combination of rule book, instruction manual, and club directory. It contained advertisements for sports goods. 
    The 85 page 1868 edition covered both Association and Rugby codes. 






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