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  • 11/03/14--11:40: A Liverpool Defender

  • Billy Balmer was , indeed a Liverpool defender, being born in West Derby. He never played for Liverpool FC though. He made 331 appearances for Everton. He scored 1 goal. 
    For the curious this was a penalty that came in a 4-2 defeat at Nottingham Forest on 17th February 1900.
    Balmer also won 1 England cap, against Ireland 1n 1905. 

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    When James Catton first contributed articles and reports to The Athletic News in 1886 he had been an avid football fan and a journalist for some 11 years. in the ensuing 40 years up until the publication of his The Story of Association Football in 1926, Catton witnessed and reported on every England v Scotland match. 
    Here are the 2 'all time XIs' he selected for inclusion in his book.


    England

    Scotland
    Goal Keeper

    Ted  Taylor

    James McAulay

    Huddersfield Town

    Dumbarton

    1922-26

    1881-87

    Caps.

    8

    Caps.

    9

    Record v.Sco.

    p 2 w 0 d 1 l 1

    Record v.Eng.

    p 5 w 3 d 2 l 0

    An interesting choice from Catton. As he was writing in 1926 Taylor was undoubtedly among the best ‘keepers in England. His success did not translate onto the international stage. The 20s was a decade in which no England keeper made the position his own.  Catton was interested in Taylor, having ‘spotted’ him as an amateur in 1912 and helping to launch his professional career.



    Catton writes fondly of his acquaintance with McAulay, who he first spoke to during an 1888 Dumbarton v Nottingham Forest match whilst play was in progress! McAulay made his international debut as a centre forward (and he scored) before earning another 8 caps between the sticks.


    Right Back

    Bob Crompton

    Walter ‘Wattie’ Arnott

    Blackburn Rovers

    Queen’s Park

    1902-14

    1884-93

    Caps.

    41

    Caps.

    14

    Goals.


    Goals.


    Record v.Sco.

    p 9  w 3 d 4  l 2

    Record v.Eng.

    p 10  w 3 d 3 l 4

    In an age when 3 matches a season was the norm, Crompton’s 41 caps mark an incredible achievement.  Consistently held to be the leading defender of his day.



    Appeared in 10 consecutive matches against England


    Left Back

    Herbert Burgess

    Andrew Watson

    Manchester City

    Queen’s Park

    1904-06

    1881-82

    Caps.

    4

    Caps.

    3

    Goals.


    Goals.


    Record v.Sco.

    p 2 w 1 d 0 l 1

    Record v.Eng.

    p 2  w  2

    Burgess played abroad later in his career (Denmark and Hungary) and then moved to Italy as a coach.

    We know about Watson, the first black international. His 2 games against England were a resounding success, with an aggregate score of 11-2.




    Right Half

    Jimmy  Crabtree

    Andrew ‘Daddler’ Aitken

    Burnley , Aston Villa

    Newcastle United, Middlesbrough , Leicester Fosse

    1894-1902

    1901-11

    Caps.

    14

    Caps.

    14

    Goals.


    Goals.


    Record v.Sco.

    p 4 w 2 d 0 l 2

    Record v.Eng.

    p 10 w 3 d 5 l 2

    One of England's greatest players. Shone in any position. Great as a half-back, but greater, possibly, as a back, kicking cleanly and with rare precision. A keen, skilful tackler, clever at close quarters and equally reliable in the open; cool, resourceful, and brainy. Excelled in the finer points of the game, and one of the most versatile players England has boasted. For many seasons unrivalled in his position.

    The Villa News and Record 1st September 1906



    Aitken was captain of Newcastle United for 6 seasons and Catton writes of seeing him writing a victory speech on the eve of an FA Cup Final which Newcastle went on to lose.


    Centre Half

    Billy ‘Fatty’ Wedlock

    Alex Raisbeck

    Bristol City

    Liverpool

    1907-14

    1900–07

    Caps.

    26

    Caps.

    8

    Goals.

    2

    Goals.


    Record v.Sco.

    p 6  w 1 d 4  l 1

    Record v.Eng.

    p 7  w 3 d 3  l 1

    Also known as the India Rubber Man, Wedlock kept Charlie Roberts out of the England team and that in itself speaks volumes. 
    Raisbeck's military bearing was reflected in his authoritative style of play. Catton admired and liked Raisbeck as a person as well as a player.


    Left Half

    Ernest  ‘Nudger’ Needham

    Peter McWilliam

    Sheffield United

    Newcastle United

    1894-1902

    1905–11

    Caps.

    16

    Caps.

    8

    Goals.

    3

    Goals.


    Record v.Sco.

    p 7 w 3 d 2 l 2

    Record v.Eng.

    p 5 w 2 d 1 l 2

    That classical master, Nudger, who would tackle a man were he as big as a mountain- thus wrote Catton of the great Needham,
    Peter the Great- Charlie Buchan cites him as an example of the half back who 'relied upon clever positioning and timely interventions'.
    Catton described the above trio, playing together against England in 1906, as being the best half back combination he ever saw. And he saw a lot of football.




    Outside Right

    Billy Bassett

    Jack  Bell

    West Bromwich Albion

    Dumbarton, Everton , Celtic

    1888-96

    1890-1900

    Caps.

    16

    Caps.

    10

    Goals.

    8

    Goals.

    5

    Record v.Sco.

    p 8 w 4 d 2 l 2

    Record v.Eng.

    p 6 w 3 d 0 l 3

    Billy Bassett, initially considered too frail for top class football at 1.65 m- he went on to become an early 'superstar ' of the game. Ernest Needham wrote of him : without doubt, the best outside right in the British Isles.

    Bell enjoyed success on both sides of the border. Described as a 'defence buster' his reputation was illustrated by the £300 that Celtic paid Everton for his signature in 1898.


    Inside Right

    Steve Bloomer

    Bobby Walker

    Derby County , Middlesbrough

    Heart of Midlothian

    1895- 1907

    1900-13

    Caps.

    23

    Caps.

    29*

    Goals.

    28

    Goals.

    8

    Record v.Sco.

    p 10 w 5  d 3 l 2

    Record v.Eng.

    p 11  w 2 d 5 l 4

     Simply one of the most prolific goalscorers in football history. 



     A real great- the player of his age.



    Centre Forward

    Dr. Tinsley Lindley

     Dr. John Smith

    Cambridge University, Nottingham Forest

    Mauchline, Edinburgh University, Queen´s Park

    1886-91


    Caps.

    13

    Caps.

    10

    Goals.

    14

    Goals.

    10

    Record v.Sco.

    p 5 w 1 d 2 l 2

    Record v.Eng.

    p 6 w 5 d 0  l 1

    Most critics of the era state with confidence that G.O Smith was England’s greatest centre forward. Catton admired G.O, and also writes great things about Vivian Woodward.   Catton lived in Nottingham in the 1880s, and saw quite a lot of Lindley’s play. He writes admiringly of Lindley’s virtuosity in shooting.



    Dr Smith scored a hat trick against England in the 6-1 win of 1881. He was banned from playing for or against any Scottish club or the Scottish national team in 1885 after he played for Corinthians against a professional English club. He was also a Rugby internationalist. 



    Inside Left

    John Goodall

    Peter Somers

    Preston North End , Derby County

    Celtic

    1888-98

    1905-09

    Caps.

    14

    Caps.

    4

    Goals.

    12

    Goals.


    Record v.Sco.

    p 7  w 4 d 1 l 2

    Record v.Eng.

    p  1 l 1

    International eligibility was a simple matter back in the 19th century- you played for the country in which you were born. England's gain- Scotland's loss- Goodall was a Scot who happened to be born in London. Catton was a Preston North End man first and foremost, but Goodall's inclusion can hardly be put down to partisanship. 

    At a time when brute strength was regarded as a key attribute for a footballer, Somers shone out among his peers for his nimble footwork and wonderful football brain. He was, in the words of Willie Maley, a “subtle strategist”- Celtic Wiki


    Outside Left

    Fred Spiksley

    Bobby Templeton

    The Wednesday

    Aston Villa, Newcastle United, Woolwich Arsenal Celtic, Kilmarnock           

    1893-98

    1902-13

    Caps.

    7

    Caps.

    11

    Goals.

    5

    Goals.

    1

    Record v.Sco.

    p 3 w 2 d 1 l 0

    Record v.Eng.

    p  5 w 2 d 2 l 1

     Spikesley was an immensely talented player who introduced the back heel. For a wide player he also had the knack of scoring goals.



     To watch Templeton at his best is a sight for the gods-Association Football and the Men Who Made It (1905).




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    Steve Bloomer , the great inside right, scored 395 goals in his club career (Derby County 527 games, Middlesbrough 130 games).
    He was also a prolific scorer in international football.
    Making his debut as a 21 year old he got 2 goals in his first match. He then proceeded to score in each of his first 10 internationals, collecting 19 goals in the process.
    In his 8th international he overtook Tinsley Lindley as England's highest ever scorer (Lindley had held the record for 7 years).
    Bloomer scored in 16 of 23 games played, a strike rate of 1.217 goals per game.

    He scored 37.3 % of England’s goals in games in which he played.









    1904- goal number 26.

    The table charts his international goals with descriptions from contemporary press reports in italics.








    Goals
    1
    09.03.95
    England
    9
    0
    Ireland
    Derby CCC
    2


    Steve got England’s 2nd (4 mins- put in a splendid run and notched a second point- a shot that the Irish goalkeeper had not the slightest chance of stopping) and 6th (58 mins- scored from a pass from Goodall). Contemporary press reports credited him with England’s 1st goal, which was later deemed an own goal.


    2
    06.04.95
    England
    3
    0
    Scotland
    Goodison

    3


    Playing at outside left, Steve opened the scoring in the 30th minute. A pass from a free kick by Holt after Goodall had been fouled.


    3
    07.03.96
    Ireland
    0
    2
    England
    Solitude, Belfast
    4


    Steve’s goal in the 75th minute was England’s 2nd. … a low, swift shot…


    4
    16.03.96
    Wales
    1
    9
    England
    Cardiff Arms Park
    8


    2nd   a shot that the Welsh custodian never saw until it was in the net. (25 mins).
    4th  (40 mins) Sandilands dashed away and with a beautiful center enabled Bloomer to score. …a ‘daisy cutter’
    6th (60 mins) after a fine combined run in the teeth of the wind Bloomer was entrusted with the final chance and made no mistake in banging the ball past the Welsh goalkeeper.

    8th   (83 mins) Bassett and Bloomer ran the ball down and the latter finished with a successful shot.
    9th  (89 mins) from a pass by Bassett.


    5
    20.02.97
    England
    6
    0
    Ireland
    Trent Bridge, Nottingham
    10


    1st (19 mins ) Passing to Smith, The English captain cleverly returned to Bloomer, who sent in, amid loud cheering, a straight,  high shot that gave Scott no chance whatever.  
     6th (85 mins) from Athersmith’s pass… Scott made a noble bid to save, but found it totally beyond his powers. A capital shot by the nimble Bloomer.



    6
    29.03.97
    England
    4
    0
    Wales
    Bramall Lane, Sheffield
    11


    Steve got England’s  2nd goal in the 44th minute. Athersmith …made a splendid run down the wing and passed to Bloomer who gave Trainer no chance with a lightning shot.



    7
    03.04.97
    England
    1
    2
    Scotland
    Crystal Palace
    12


    Steve put England in front in the 19th minute. Athersmith… reached the line, and then with a wonderful kick dropped the ball in front of goal, and Bloomer put it into the net. 

    Athersmith… shot across goal. Bloomer, however, was on the spot, and, taking possession in the melee, he got past Patrick…



    8
    02.04.98
    Scotland
    1
    3
    England
    Celtic Park
    15


    The ‘sovereigns’ game. England’s captain, Wreford-Brown, presented Bloomer with a gold sovereign after he scored. He was responsible for England’s 2nd   (a high shot) and 3rd(A bad bit of play by Gibson gave Bloomer what was practically an open goal) goals , in the 23rd and 72nd minutes. 


    Bloomer’s 2nd goal saw him overtake Tinsley Lindley to become England’s all-time top scorer.


    9
    18.02.99
    England
    13
    2
    Ireland
    Roker Park, Sunderland
    17


     Bloomer, following up a shot by Athersmith which Lewis could not quite get away, kicked the  5th goal (40 mins)
    He scored England’s 13th (89 mins)
    Bloomer also missed a penalty at 5-0.


    10
    20.03.99
    England
    4
    0
    Wales
    Ashton Gate, Bristol
    19


    2nd (44 min),  when (Jones) ventured out to save a good one from Athersmith he was successful, but before he could get back Bloomer put the ball into the net.

     4th (86) Forman… pressed towards the goal and Bloomer stopped the ball, and, turning round, scored…



    11
    08.04.99
    England
    2
    1
    Scotland
    Villa Park



    This was Bloomer’s 11th International and the first in which he did not score.


    12
    07.04.00
    Scotland
    4
    1
    England
    Celtic Park
    20


    Steve scored in the 35th minute to make it 3-1. Athersmith dribbled down past Robertson. Drummond caused him more trouble, but could not clear, and Bloomer dashing onto the ball (scored).


    13
    18.03.01
    England
    6
    0
    Wales
    St James' Park, Newcastle
    24


    1st    (38) Corbett raced up the wing and centred finely to Bloomer, the latter snapping the ball nicely passed Roose just below the crossbar.
    3rd (?) Foster’s shot… was cleared by Roose but Bloomer got onto the ball and kicked a third…

    4th   (80) from a scrimmage…took a shot and hitting the inside of the post…
    6th  (83) a blunder by Morris… Roose delaying his rush too long.


    14
    30.03.01
    England
    2
    2
    Scotland
    Crystal Palace
    25


    Steve made it 2-2 in the 80th minute with what was reported to be a sensational goal. Bloomer broke almost from his own goal line…with sound judgement he drew Rennie out of goal and made the score ‘two goals all’.


    15
    03.03.02
    Wales
    0
    0
    England
    Racecourse, Wrexham





    16
    22.03.02
    Ireland
    0
    1
    England
    Balmoral Showgrounds, Belfast





    17
    03.05.02
    England
    2
    2
    Scotland
    Villa Park



    Bloomer captained England in this match, however, he ended the 1902 International campaign without a goal.


    18
    09.04.04
    Scotland
    0
    1
    England
    Celtic Park
    26


    Steve marked his comeback with a 64th minute winner. (Watson) missed his kick and the ball came to Bloomer , who found the net with a high shot…quite unsavable


    19
    25.02.05
    England
    1
    1
    Ireland
    Ayresome Park, Middlesbrough
    27


    A 50th minute equalizer. An easy thing for him, as he received it close in and had no one but the goalkeeper to beat.


    20
    27.03.05
    England
    3
    1
    Wales
    Anfield





    21
    01.04.05
    England
    1
    0
    Scotland
    Crystal Palace





    22
    18.03.07
    England
    1
    1
    Wales
    Craven Cottage



    Another comeback, but no scoring boots…


    23
    06.04.07
    England
    1
    1
    Scotland
    St James' Park, Newcastle
    28


    Fittingly Steve Bloomer scored on his international farewell- his 42nd minute strike levelling the game.
    He took a pretty pass from Veitch … and drove in a great low shot which shook the rigging , and caused a tumult that might have been expected to bring down the scores of people who were finding scanty and precarious foothold on the steep slates of four storey houses facing the ground.




    Bloomer held the England record for 4 years , when his total was overtaken by Vivian Woodward.






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  • 11/11/14--10:06: French Losses 1914-19


  • 22 French internationals died during World War I:


    René Camard - Association Sportive Francais Paris (08.02.87- 16.03.15) 
    The outside left won 1 cap against Belgium in 1907.
    Killed in action in Carnoy (Somme).

    Julien Denis Racing Club de Calais (14.08.81- 25.09.15) 

    Half back, 2 caps in 1908. Calais' stadium is named in his honour.
    Killed in action at Souchez.
    Charles Dujardin - Union Sportive Tourquennoise (15.04.88 - 29.08.14) 
     1 cap v Switzerland 1913
     Died from injuries sustained in the battle of the Aisne.


    Émile Dusart Racing Club de Roubaix (03.09.92 -13.03.19)
    Defender- 1 cap v Hungary in 1914.
    A nurse, he died of influenza at Mainz.
    René Fenouillère - Red Star Amical Club de Paris (22.10.82 - 04.11.16) 
    The forward won 1 cap, in the 1908 Olympics at London.
    The stadium of U.S. Avranches is named in his honour.
     Killed in action at Reims.

    André François Racing Club de Roubaix (1885 - 17.03.15)
    6 caps,3 goals.Captain at the 1908 Olympics (in a  17-1 loss against Denmark).
    Died of injuries in Meuse.
    Charles Geronimi - AF Garenne Colombes Paris (08.02.95 - 09.11.18) 
    Inside left, he won 1 cap, v Luxembourg in 1914. 
    Died of  injuries at Souilly.

    Raymond Gigot - Club Français Paris (11.05.85-25.09.15)
    Outside left, 1 cap, v Belgium in 1905. 
    Killed in action at Pas de Calais.

    Raoul Gressier Racing Club de Calais (19.11.85 - 06.10.15)
    1 cap against Denmark at the 1908 Olympics for the team designated France B, losing 9-0.
    Missing in action at Tahure.
    Ernest Guéguen - Union Sportive Servannaise et Malouine Saint-Malo (30.05.85 - 25.09.15)
    1 cap, v England Amateurs 1913. 
     Killed in action in the Second Battle of the Marne.

    Victor  Hitzel - JA Levallois (?-?)

    A forward, he won 1 cap against England Amateurs in 1909.

    Albert Jenicot - Racing Club de Roubaix (15.02.85 - 22.02.16) 

    aka Jules Aristide Jenicot
    A forward who made 3 international appearances in 1908, including an Olympic match.
    Killed in action at Vacherauville.

    Emile Lesmann - JA Saint-Ouen (03.05.91 - 15.09.14)
    A forward who faced Belgium in 1912.
    Killed at The battle of Marne.

    Jean Loubiere - Gallia Club Paris (07.01.92 - 04.02.15)
     Goalkeeper in 1 match against  Luxembourg in 1914 
     Killed in action at Massiges.

    Pol Morel - Red Star Amical Club de Paris (05.03.90 - 28.09.15) 
    A forward who won 2 caps in 1911
    Killed in action at Servins.

    Eugène Petel - AS Amicale Alfortville (1881-?)
    1 cap, v Belgium , 1910.

    André Puget - Racing Club de Paris (12.01.82 - 09.05.15) 
    Outside right- 1 appearance v  Belgium in 1907.
    Killed in action at the Battle of Artois.

    Marius Royet - Union Sportive Parisienne (19.06.80 - 08.11.18) 
    9 caps and 2 goals, including 1 in France's first ever international in 1904. 
    Died of influenza in Mannheim. 

    Pierre Six Olympique Lillois (18.01.88 - 1916)
    Played for France B at the 1908 Olympics. 
    Killed in action at the Somme.
    Julien Verbrugghe Association Sportive Française Paris (26.12.89 - 21.08.16)  
    France's youngest ever international (16 years and 10 months) in a 15-0 loss to England Amateurs  (1906). 3 further caps in 1911.
    Killed in action at the Somme.

     Francis Vial - Club Athletique de Vitry (?-1916)
    1 cap v Luxemblourg, 1911.

    Justin Vialaret  CA Paris XIVe (12.11.83 - 30.09.16)
    Played 1 match for France B at the 1908 Olympics. 

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  • 11/13/14--13:30: Hamilton Crescent

  • Cricket was being played in Hamilton Crescent before the West of Scotland Cricket Club was founded in 1862.
    Hamilton Crescent's place in sporting history was assured when it was chosen by Queen's Park to host what is considered to be the first ever international Association football match.
    As we have seen , Charles Alcock had , in his enthusiasm to spread the association game, instituted 'international' matches in 1870. The 'Scottish' teams involved were not truly representative, the players usually having only tenuous connections with Scotland. Alcock didn't want this to be the case, however. He wanted genuine Scottish representation, as we can see from the following letter, which appeared in  The Glasgow Herald in November 1870:

    ENGLAND versus SCOTLAND
    Sir,—Will you allow me a few lines in your paper to notify to Scottish players that a match under the above title will take place in London on Saturday, 19th inst, according to the rules of the Football Association? It is the object of the committee to select the best elevens at their disposal in the two countries, and I cannot but think that the appearance of some of the more prominent celebrities of football on the northern side of the Tweed would do much to disseminate a healthy feeling of good fellowship among the contestants, and tend to promote to a still greater extent the extension of the game. In Scotland, once essentially the land of football, there should still be a spark left of the old fire, and I confidently appeal to Scotsmen to aid to their utmost the efforts of the committee to confer success on what London fondly hopes to found, an annual trial of skill between the champions of England and Scotland. Messrs. A. F. Kinnaird, 2 Pall Mall East, London, and J. Kirkpatrick, Admiralty, Somerset House, London, will be glad to receive the names of any Scottish player who will take part against England in the match in question.—I am, etc.,
    Charles W. Alcock, Hon. Secretary of Football Association.
    West Dulwich, Surrey, 1st November, 1870.

    Queen's Park responded to the letter by asking if one of their members could play, They nominated Robert Smith (conveniently he had recently moved to London and was playing for South Norwood). Smith consequently played in the 2nd and 3rd 'Alcock Internationals'.

    Queen's Park wrote to Alcock in the summer of 1872. What was happening regarding international matches? would the Football Association be disposed to send a team to play Scotland in Scotland? In effect the  Queen's Park club assumed responsibility for responding to Charles Alcock's challenge to Scottish footballers. There was no Scottish Football Association at the time. Queen's Park were in effect the governing body in Scottish football, as well as dominating the game on the pitch they were also arbiters and guardians of the rules. One thing that they didn't have, however, was a ground of their own. They still played in public parks.



    Queen's Park were devilishly good at organizing things. They set up subcommittees to handle every aspect of preparing for the visit of the English.  The West of Scotland Cricket Club were approached regarding the use of Hamilton Crescent. Queen's Park anticipated the match being a lucrative event. The following terms were agreed:
    West of Scotland Cricket Club to receive £10* for staging the match and and a further sum of £10 should the receipts exceed  £50. 
    This was a bold move by Queen's Park, who only had £7 in their account and had been offered the Burnbank Rugby ground free of charge.
    It paid off, though, as the takings reached £102 19s. 6d. Admission was 1 shilling and the attendance topped 4,000. 
    The match cost a total of  £69 11s. 6d to stage, leaving Queen's Park a balance of £33 8s which they used to fund their journey to London for the following season's international.
    One thing about this first international troubles me- if, according to  F.I.F.A. regulations, a match must be organised according to the prescribed rules by two National Football Associations, then should this game be considered a full international? There was no Scottish FA. Queen's Park organised the match, selected the team and provided all the players (who incidentally played in Queen's Park's colours). 
    Hamilton Cresecent had served it's purpose well, though. Queen's Park moved into the first Hampden Park in 1873, but the internationals of 1874 and 1876 were both played in Hamilton Crescent, as were the first 2 matches of the 1877 Scottish Cup Final between Glasgow Rangers and Vale of Leven. (It took 2 replays to settle the tie- the 2 matches at Hamilton Crescent were drawn, 1-1). 

    * 1872 Pre decimal money: 1 pound (£) = 20 shillings (s). 1 shilling = 12 pence (d). A general labourer earned about £1 per week. 




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    Harry Hampton was with Aston Villa for 16 seasons,  scoring 242 goals in 376 games. He remains Aston Villa's top scorer in Football League matches (215).
    Hampton won 4 England caps:
    v Wales 17.03.13 (1 goal)
    v Scotland 05.04.13 (1 goal)
    v Wales 16.03.14
    v Scotland 14.04.14


    Outside Right Charlie Wallace made his England debut in the same match as Hampton.
    Wallace made 3 international appearances, separated by the war:
    v Wales 17.03.13
    v Ireland 14.02.14
    v Scotland 10.04.20

    Wallace spent 10 seasons at Villa, his 350 appearances bringing 57 goals. 18 of Wallace's goals came from the penalties, but he is better known for one he missed- in Villa's 1913 FA Cup Final win over Sunderland he shot wide from the spot.



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    Matches such as this were the staple in the pre League football days.
    Even in friendly competition local and regional rivalries could become fierce; when a trophy and medals were at stake competition became more intense. Winning a County trophy also enabled a club to secure more lucrative friendly fixtures. In the 1880–81 season West Bromwich Albion had inflicted Stoke's first defeat in competitive football in the first round of this competition. 

    This Staffordshire Cup Final, played on April 21st 1883, drew a crowd of  6,150 . To put that into context the FA Cup Final at The Oval that season saw an attendance of 8,000, and the England v Scotland fixture at Bramall Lane  was watched by 7,000,

    This match was played at Stoke Athletic Ground. Stoke had scored 42 goals en route to the final. 
    1,500 West Bromwich Albion supporters travelled on a Football Special to Stoke.  The 2 clubs were founder members of the Football League 5 years later and 131 years later both feature in the Premier League. 
     Neither team wore the colours with which we now associate them- Albion wore red and white hoops and Stoke blue and black hoops. 

    West Bromwich Albion won a thrilling game by 3-2. It was the club's first trophy. 

    Both Stoke and West Bromwich Albion entered the FA Cup for the first time in the 1883–84 season.


    West Bromwich Albion




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  • 11/19/14--13:18: The Rev. Frank Marshall
  • The Rev. Frank Marshall was a clergyman and the headmaster of Almondbury Grammar School, Huddersfield. He was the co-author of Football; the Rugby Union game (1895). Rev Marshall was a referee and president of  the Yorkshire RFU.
    In the 1880s and 1890s he was at the centre of a crusade against 'broken time payments' in Rugby football. Rev. Marshall believed that for anyone to receive payments in any form for playing football was morally reprehensible. His zeal for preserving amateurism knew no bounds. He was a committee member at Huddersfield FC, but this didn't prevent him for reporting them for professionalism, leading to a ban. 
    Rev. Marshall's activities ultimately led to what is known as The Great Schism. In 1895 clubs who favoured 'broken time payments' to compensate their working class players for wages lost when they were playing football, broke away from the Rugby Union and formed the Northern Union. These clubs developed a different code that created a faster, more exciting game that we now know as Rugby League. 
    So, what has this got to do with us, concerned as we are with the history of the Association game?

    The  FA Cup 4th round tie played between Preston North End and the London club Upton Park on January 19th 1884 can be considered one of the most significant games in the history of Association football. The controversy following this game (which will be dealt with in more detail in a later post) led directly to the Football Association's acceptance of professionalism.



    Liverpool Mercury 21.01.84

    Was this the same Rev. F. Marshall?
    It has never been made clear who provided the catalyst that inspired  Upton Park, in the person of the Secretary- Mr Barnett, to report Preston to the FA. Their local rivals Blackburn Olympic denied any involvement. Indeed, the press commented that none of the leading Lancashire clubs would be able to defend themselves against charges of professionalism.
    I can find no other references to Rev F Marshall as a referee of Association games, and he seems to have had no input into the debate that raged on into the summer of 1885 regarding professionalism in football.



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  • 11/20/14--11:16: AGF Fodbold
  • This is a very simple post. No story, no statistics, just a couple of old team photographs.
    The team is AGF Fodbold, of Aarhus in Denmark. 

    1908

    1927

    I tend to admire any attempt to break from the traditional team photograph, and this is one of my favourites, largely due to the coach's breeches and cigarette.



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  • 11/21/14--09:35: Boca Juniors in Europe-1925



  • In 1925 Boca Juniors undertook a 3 month tour of Europe, focusing on Spain but also taking in games in Germany and France.
    They forfeited the majority of the 1925 domestic season in order to do so, competing in just 7 games on their return, in which they were unbeaten.


    This is the squad of players that participated in the tour:


    Américo Tesoriere *

    Ludovico Bidoglio*

    Ramón Muttis*

    Segundo Médici*

    Alfredo Elli*

     Mario Busso

    Domingo Tarasconi *

    Antonio Cerrotti*

    Dante Pertini*

    Carmelo Pozzo

    Carlos Antraygues

    Alfredo Garasini*


    Guest players:

    Manuel Seoane  (El Porvenir)*

    Cesáreo Onzari (Huracán)*

    Luis Vaccaro (Argentinos Juniors)*

    Octavio Díaz (Rosario Central)*

    Roberto Cochrane (Tiro Federal de Rosario)*


    * Argentina internationals.

    The hosting teams in Spain routinely deployed guest players or took the form of 'combined teams'. This has led to discrepancies in how the teams were named in reports.

    Spain

    05.03.25

    Real Club Celta de Vigo

    1

    3

    Boca Juniors

    Vigo




    08.03.25

    Galicia

    3

    1

    Boca Juniors

    Vigo


    Combined Celta, Eiriña and Racing Club de Ferrol



    12.03.25

    Deportivo La Coruña

    0

    3

    Boca Juniors

    La Coruña




    15.03.25

    Deportivo La Coruña

    0

    1

    Boca Juniors

    La Coruña


    In these games Deportivo  also featured players from Racing and Real Unión Club de Irún



    19.03.25

    Atlético Madrid

    1

    2

    Boca Juniors

    Estadio Metropolitano


    Athletic Bilbao and Real Unión Club de Irún provided guests.



    22.03.25

    Real Madrid

    0

    1

    Boca Juniors

    Estadio de Chamartín




    29.03.25

    Sociedad Gimnástica de San Sebastián

    0

    1

    Boca Juniors

    Estadio Metropolitano


    Featuring players from Arenas, Real Madrid



    02.04.25

    Real Unión Club de Irún

    4

    0

    Boca Juniors

    San Mamés, Bilbao




    05.04.25

    Athletic Bilbao

    4

    2

    Boca Juniors

    San Mamés, Bilbao


    Featuring players from Arenas, Real Osasuna



    19.04.25

    Real Osasuna

    0

    1

    Boca Juniors

    Pamplona


    Featuring players from Arenas Athletic Bilbao



    26.04.25

    Real Deportivo Espanyol
    0

    1

    Boca Juniors

    Estadio de Sarriá, Barcelona




    01.05.25

    Real Deportivo Espanyol

    0

    3

    Boca Juniors

    Estadio de Sarriá, Barcelona


    Featuring players from Sanz



    03.05.25

    Catalunya

    0

    2

    Boca Juniors

    Estadio de Sarriá, Barcelona




    Germany

    09.05.25

    Bayern Munich

    1

    1

    Boca Juniors

    Grunwalder, Munich







    16.05.25

    Berlin Combined

    0

    3

    Boca Juniors

    Berlin







    21.05.25

    SpVgg 1899 Leipzig

    0

    7

    Boca Juniors

    Leipzig







    24.05.25

    Frankfurt Combined

    0

    2

    Boca Juniors

    Municipal, Frankfurt







    27.05.25

    Eintracht Frankfurt

    0

    2

    Boca Juniors

    Municipal, Frankfurt







    France

    07.06.25

    Paris Combined

    2

    4

    Boca Juniors

    Parc des Princes


    Olympique & Sp. Française









    P

    W

    D

    L

    F

    A

    19

    15

    1

    3

    40

    16



    Seoane
    Manuel Seoane was the leading scorer with  12 goals (from 16 games)
    Cerroti got 10 and Tarasconi 7.
     For an interesting study of the tour in the context of Argentine national identity see 


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  • 11/23/14--11:29: Sheffield v Manchester 1868
  • Sheffield Daily Telegraph -  04.04.68

    As we can see from the result (2 rouges to nothing) this was a game played under the Sheffield Rules. Whilst acknowledging the importance of the Sheffield Rules I avoid devoting too much space on this blog to Sheffield Football in the 1850s and 60s. As the subtitle says- Association Football around the world.
    However, I found this brief snippet of interest for 2 reasons:
    1-Manchester. We have seen how football really took hold in Lancashire in the 1870s and 80s, (50% of the original 12 League clubs were from Lancashire) and yet Manchester itself was not  represented until the emergence of Newton Heath and Ardwick, and then they did not consistently command high positions. 
    2- Sheffield FC joined the Football Association in 1863, even though they retained their own code until the merger of 1878. The Football Association was formed with the intention of unifying the various football codes. And here, 5 years on, a Sheffield journalist rues the absence of a general code of rules.




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  • 11/24/14--12:18: Saturday and Sunday...

  • On March 5th 1899 Old Boys Basel were due to play Lausanne Football and Cricket Club in the finals of the Swiss National Championship. Lausanne had scored 10 goals to 2 against in their 2 group matches, whereas Old Boys had required a replay to get past their local rivals Basel. 
    Lausanne, however, withdrew from the game, presenting Old Boys with a walkover. March the 5th was a Sunday. Lausanne's membership was largely made up of Englishmen, and Englishmen did not play football on Sundays...
    In the United Kingdom football was always a Saturday game. Saturday and football, almost synonymous. In fact the very first game played using the newly drafted Association Rules, the goalless draw between Barnes and Richmond, took place on a Saturday- 19th December 1863.
    As early as 1869 the Roman Catholic bishop of Liverpool had supported the view that playing football on a Sunday should be allowed as preferable to spending time in the pub, but it  was not until  111 years after the foundation of the Football Association that a Football match was held on a Sunday in the UK.
    Saturday afternoon was enshrined as the leisure preserve of the working man by the Factory Act of  1856, which stated that all work must stop at 2pm on a Saturday. Even though the originators of  organized football were not working men, they would have been connected to this five and a half day pattern of work by their business or professional interests.
    Despite the widespread adoption of  la semaine anglaise other countries tended not to associate Saturday as being football day and Sunday a sacred day of rest. So when did countries around the world tend to play their football?


    U.S.A  -The practice of playing on Saturdays was copied in the USA ( the matches of the 1884-85 American Cup providing the earliest example).

    South America-Sunday was the favoured day. Internationals between Argentina  and Uruguay were played on Sundays (sometimes on a weekday). In the amateur era Argentine league matches were played on any day of the week.




    Austria-Hungary- In Hungary league matches were played on a Sunday from the outset. International matches seem to have been played on occasion in midweek, but generally on a Sunday.

    Germany- Germany played international matches on a Sunday (with the exception of an early game against England amateurs) and the matches in the domestic club competitions also took part on Sundays.

    France- Sunday was the day for football. 

    Italy- matches were played on a Sunday from the earliest times (the most extreme example being the 1898 championship all being decided on one day).

    Spain- the early fixtures of Barcelona seem to have taken place on just about any day of the week, and weekday football appears to have been the norm in the early days of the Copa del Rey. When La Liga came into being in 1929 Sunday was football day.





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    In  February 1900 the football section of the multi-sport club München Turn Verein 1879 were keen to join the Süddeutschen Fußball-Verband, but the club denied them permission to do so. This led to a breakaway club being formed under the leadership of photographer Franz John. 
    The 86 clubs that had been present for the founding of the Deutscher Fußball-Bund the previous month had included 3 Munich teams-  1. Münchner FC 1896FC Nordstern 1896 München and FC Bavaria 1899 München.
    The new Bayern club soon eclipsed all their local rivals. Their first fixture was a 5-2 win over 
    1. Münchner FC 1896.
    On 21st  September 1902 the first Münchner Stadtderby sawBayern Munich beating TSV 1860 3-0.



    The Bayern team that faced TSV 1890  in 1902.The club colours were white until 1906.




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  • 11/26/14--13:36: British coaches in the Copa



  • The development of Spanish Football was always heavily influenced by Britons. As was so often the case they founded the earliest clubs and spread the enthusiasm for the Association game among the locals.
    English players (and officials) were very much in evidence in the formative years of the game in Spain. In the 1910s, when the game was more solidly established and less and less English names appeared on the teamsheets, Englishmen showed their influence in another sphere- appearing as coaches at the leading Spanish clubs.
    Looking at the teams competing in the Copa del Rey (and later the Copa del Presidente de la República) shows us the following coaches from the United Kingdom.

    1916
    Athletic Club (Bilbao) defeated Madrid FC (later Real Madrid) 4-0 in the final. Both teams were led by Englishmen.

    Barnes

    Billy Barnes was at the helm for Athletic. Born in London in 1879 Barnes played for Thames Ironworks, Sheffield United, West Ham United, Luton Town, Queen's Park Rangers and Southend United.
    He scored the winning goal for Sheffield United in the replay of the 1902 FA Cup Final.
    He managed Athletic from 1914 to 1916 and again from 1920-21.


    Johnson
    The man in charge of Madrid FC was Arthur Johnson. He was Madrid's first full time coach. Appointed in 1910, he served until 1920. He had also been a player with the club, appearing in their first ever fixture and played in 4 winning Copa del Rey teams. Johnson, who was also born in 1879, later managed Athletic Club.

    1917
    Madrid beat Arenas Club de Guecho in extra time of the replayed final, giving Arthur Johnson a Copa win as a coach to add to his 4 as a player.

    1918
    Johnson led Madrid to a third successive Copa final, but they lost 2-0 to Real Unión.


    Greenwell

    1919
    Barcelona were beaten 5-2 in the final by Arenas Club de Guecho. 
    The manager  of Barcelona was the former Crook Town wing half Jack Greenwell.  Greenwell had also played in the West Aukland team that won the Sir Thomas Lipton Trophy in 1909. 
    He joined Barcelona as a player in 1912, became coach in 1917.six Catalan titles and two Copa del Rey victories.
    As well as 2 spells at Barcelona Greenwell coached Unió Esportiva Sants, Club Deportivo Castellón,  Español, R.C.D Mallorca, Valencia, and Real Sporting de Gijón. He then moved on to Peru. 

    1920
    Greenwell and Barnes were the adversaries as Barcelona beat Athletic Club 2-0 in the final. 

    1921
    Barnes was in charge of Athletic Club , who ran out 4-0 winners against Atlético Madrid. Some sources mistakenly identify the manager of the Madrid side as former Manchester United defender Vince Hayes However, Hayes was engaged at Preston North End until 1923. 

    1922
    Another win for Greenwell- Barcelona beating Real Union 5-1.

    1923
    Athletic Club won their ninth  Copa, beating Barcelona's Club Deportivo Europe 1-0. Both sides were led by Englishmen.
    Fred Pentland won 5 England caps in 1909 (including 3 on a tour of Austria-Hungary) and played most of his  League football for Blackburn Rovers and Middlesbrough. he was interned at Ruhleben during the war, having gone to Germany to coach the national side. After the war his managerial career resumed, following a rather strange trajectory- he led France in the 1920 Olympics and retired as manager of Barrow 20 years later. in the interim he had spells coaching Racing  SantanderAthletic Club Bilbao (2 ), Atlético Madrid (3) and Real Oviedo. 

    In charge of  Club Deportivo Europe was Conyers 'Ralph' Kirby, a winger who made 1 league appearance for Birmingham. He later joined Barcelona. 


    1924
    Real Unión Club (Irun) beat Real Madrid 1-0 in the final.Real Unión Club was coached by Steve Bloomer, the legendary Derby County and England goalscorer. 
    Steve Bloomer

    1926
    Barcelona beat Atlético Madrid 3-2 in the final, which featured the same managers as 1923- Kirby leading Barcelona and Pentland Atlético.

    1932
    Spain was now a Republic, and the national cup competition was rebranded as Copa del Presidente de la República. A final between Athletic Club (who won their 12th Copa with a 1-0 win) and Barcelona saw 2 by now familiar faces in charge. Pentland (Athletic Club) and Greenwell (Barca). 








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    13th June 1928, Uruguay have won the Olympic Tournament, beating Argentina 2-1 in the replayed final.  Pictured are Juan Piriz (Nacional), Alvaro Gestido (Peñarol) and Hector Scarone (Nacional). Scarone had scored the winning goal in the 73rd minute. 




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    Sussex Express 10.04.31


    Jackie Carr- 449 appearances for Middlesbrough, capped twice by England (1919-1923). When this article appeared Carr was approaching the end of his playing days (he was 29) and shortly afterwards left Blackpool for Hartlepools United.  He began his management career with Hartlepools in 1932 and later took charge at Tranmere Rovers and Darlington.


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  • 11/29/14--13:43: Souvenir

  • A curious memento. And for tissue paper to survive 100 years...
    Described as follows in an auction catalogue:
    1910 F.A. Cup third round commemorative tissue Imprinted 'Souvenir of the English Cup third round Played at St James Park Newcastle Saturday Feb. 19th 1910', with team pictures and annotation of players names underneath. Floral flag design to outer edges. Printed by Mrs S.Burgess of Bishopsgate, London.

    If we look at the teams that played that day we will see that there was plenty of quality on show.  Blackburn Rovers were 3rd in Division 1 and Newcastle United 6th. 

    Newcastle United


    Blackburn Rovers

    Jimmy Lawrence

    G

    Jimmy Ashcroft

    Billy McCracken

    RB

    Bob Crompton

    Tony Whitson

    LB

    Arthur Cowell

    Colin Veitch

    RH

    Albert Walmsley

    Wilf Low

    CH

    George Chapman

    Peter McWilliam

    LH

    Billy Bradshaw

    Jock Rutherford

    OR

    Billy Garbutt

    Jimmy Howie

    IR

    Eddie Latheron

    Albert Shepherd

    CF

    Ellis Crompton

    Sandy Higgins

    IL

    Wattie Aitkenhead

    George Wilson

    OL

    Walter Anthony


    The 54,000 crowd brought in receipts in excess of £2000 (described in the contemporary press as 'an enormous sum').
    Higgins opened the scoring in the first minute ( a quick short drive). Rutherford added a second in the 25th minute but Rovers immediately pulled one back through Anthony. Howie completed the scoring in the second half.



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    1891 pitch markings

    It is a standing insult to sportsmen to have to play under a rule which assumes that players intend to trip, hack and push their opponents, and to behave like cads of the most unscrupulous kidney. The lines marking a penalty area are a disgrace to the playing fields of a public school.
    C B Fry (1907)

     By the beginning of the 20th century the Public Schools' influence on Association Football had declined markedly. Old Etonians had been the last 'Old Boys'' club to reach the FA Cup Final in 1883, Queen's Park (1885) the last amateur club to achieve the feat.
    England's international XIs were becoming increasingly professional in make up.
    The FA Amateur Cup, a knockout tournament for amateur teams affiliated to the FA, was introduced in 1894, but again teams from industrial, northern areas tended to prevail. In the first 10 seasons of the Amateur Cup Old Carthusians (twice) and Old Malvernians were the only Old Boys' clubs to lift the trophy. The Old Boys' clubs then resorted to instituting a competition exclusively for the Public Schools. This was the Arthur Dunn Cup, named in honour of the Cambridge University, Old Etonians, Corinthian and England player who had first proposed such a competition but had died before any action was taken.

    ATB Dunn

    The Committee formed at the inaugural meeting features many eminent names from this particular sphere:
    President: Lord Kinnaird (Eton).
     Vice-Presidents: R C Guy (Forest), R C Gosling (Eton)
     Committee: R T Squire (Westminster), G O Smith (Charterhouse), W J Oakley (Shrewsbury), C Wreford-Brown (Charterhouse), R E Foster (Malvern), W M Cowan (Brighton), J R Mason (Winchester). 
    Hon Secretary: N Malcolmson
    The trophy was donated by Cunliffe Gosling, traditionally held to be the richest man to ever play football for England. 

    The reactionary nature of these privileged amateurs is illustrated by the fact that a decade after the introduction of the penalty kick the concept caused such an affront to their notion of fair play that, given their own competition to govern, they effectively ignored the penalty kick rule. They also used unregistered referees. These two issues brought the Public Schools into conflict with the FA and led to the Public Schools being granted representation on the Council of the Football Association (in the person of Mr Malcolmson).




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  • 12/02/14--14:38: Liverpool


  • Liverpool Football Club was officially founded in 1915, although its roots go back to 1908 when a group of students at a Capuchin Catholic School in the Nuevo París area of Montevideo decided to form a team. They followed the trend, current at the time, of having an Anglicized name for their club. As one of the principal ports of  the United Kingdom Liverpool had strong links with Montevideo, and this is said to have influenced the choice of name as the students looked at a map of England for inspiration.
    Despite the choice of name, blue was adopted as the club colours, later evolving into blue and black stripes. 
    Liverpool first played in the Primera División in 1920.



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