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Racing Club de Avellaneda

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0

 Racing Club de Avallaneda traces its origins to Football Club Barracas al Sud, formed in 1901 by students at  Colegio Nacional Central, reputedly the first club to be formed by native born Argentinians rather than British incomers. 
After some internal wrangling over colours and the like the club became consolidated as Racing Club in 1903, taking its name from the Parisian team.
Racing Club joined the  Argentine Football Association in 1905. they were promoted to the Primera División in 1910.
During the following decade they enjoyed a period of spectacular dominance in the league.
Here are the statistics from the 7 consecutive seasons in which Racing Club won league titles:



P
W
D
L
F
A
1913
20
17
1
2
52
6
1914
12
11
1
0
42
7
1915
25
23
2
0
96
5
1916
21
15
4
2
39
10
1917
20
16
3
1
58
4
1918
19
17
2
0
49
9
1919
13
13
0
0
43
10







totals
130
112
13
5
379
51


86%


2.91
0.39


1913-18: Asociación Argentina de Football (up until there were 2 Leagues, Asociación Argentina de Football  and Federación Argentina de Football these merged in 1915)
1919: Asociación Amateurs de Football (this was a dissident league)




Ohaco

The leading crack at Racing during this era was  Alberto Ohaco. In 11 seasons at the club he won 19 trophies, including 8 league championships (7 in succession). He was league top scorer for 4 seasons in a row (1912-1915). In all he scored 244 goals in 278 league matches. 

Sunderland & Sunderland Albion

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0
Albion
Sunderland AFC joined The Football League for the 1890–91 season, the first 'new' club (ie not one of the original 12- they replaced Stoke) to join since the  inauguration of the league in 1888. Their first 5 seasons in League football were a spectacular success:

1890–91- 7th
1891–92- champions
1892–93- champions
1893–94- 2nd
1894–95- champions
And yet, even as the seeds of this strength were being sown, there was a challenge to Sunderland's position as the principal team in the town. 
Sunderland had been founded in 1879 as Sunderland and District Teachers' Association Football Club, by James Allan, a Scotsman. Sunderland first played competitive football in 1884 (entering the FA Cup).
The 1888  a rift occurred between Sunderland and James Allan (who was by then club treasurer). Allan and a number of other members were disheartened by the way the club was developing. Something of a 'final straw' was the FA Cup tie with Middlesbrough in December 1887. Sunderland won the tie 4-2 in a thrilling replay but were subsequently disqualified for fielding players who did not meet the FA's stringent guidelines on the use of professionals. The players in question, Monaghan, Richardson and Hastings had recently been signed from Scotland, and did not meet the eligibility criteria. 
Charles Alcock issued a telegram on 29th December confirming Sunderland's expulsion. 



Sunderland Daily Echo 28.12.87


James Allan

James Allan was instrumental in the founding of a new club, Sunderland Albion, in March 1888. Several former Sunderland players were to feature for Albion.

Here is a summary of their rather short existence


Season

FA Cup

Football Alliance

Northern League

1888-89

R1



1889-90

R1 disq.

3rd


1890-91

R2

2nd

3rd

1891-92

R2


6th
Acknowledgements to F.C.H.D 

Sunderland v Sunderland Albion, 1888-89.

It could be argued that during this stage of Albion's existence the conduct of Sunderland was entirely designed to deprive their new neighbours of funds.  At this point Albion were still playing on an unenclosed ground ( at Blue House Field, one of Sunderland's former homes) and not charging admission. They needed funds to establish themselves commercially, and there was also a possibility that Albion could have taken over Newcastle Road. Sunderland delayed moving to their new ground for this very reason.

In December 1888 the teams were drawn to face each other in both the FA Cup (4th Qualifying Round) and the Durham County Cup. 
Sunderland withdrew from both competitions, claiming that they couldn't field a strong team, their Scottish professionals still being ineligible on residency grounds.
It is possible, however, that the refusal to play Albion was motivated by a reluctance to give them a good payday.
In fact, when public pressure led to the arrangement of 2 'friendlies' Sunderland would only play on the condition that the gate receipts went to charity.
The eagerly awaited matches took place in December 1888 and January 1889:

01.12.88 
Sunderland

2

0

Sunderland Albion

Davison, A.Peacock


Newcastle Road, attendance: c 15,000


W. Kirtley
GK
Angus
J. Oliver
RB
McFarlane
R. McDermid
LB
Munro
McKechnie
RH
Richardson
J. McLauchlan
CH
Moore
Gibson
LH
J. Stewart
J. Smith
OR
Kilpatrick
A. Davison
IR
S. Stewart
Breckonridge
CF
McClellan
W. Peacock
IL
Gloag
A. Peacock
OL
Hastings

This was Albion's first defeat in 14 games.
The second match was reportedly played for a trophy:

12.01.89

Sunderland

3

2

Sunderland Albion

uk, uk, Breckonridge

uk, uk,


Newcastle Road, attendance: c 10,000


Team unchanged.

Line up unknown but featured 2 loanees from Accrington- Barbour and Brand.


It was a controversial match that did nothing to reduce the ill feeling between the 2 parties.
Albion were 2-0 up at half time, but Sunderland rallied and drew level. With 2 minutes remaining Albion goalkeeper Angus made a clearance that cannoned off Breckonridge and, according to many witnesses, flew over the crossbar. Referee Mr Stacey of Sheffield awarded a goal (this was in the pre-net era of course). Albion's players left the field in protest. Mr Stacey waited until the 90 minutes was up and blew for time.
Supporters expressed their disapproval of Albion's conduct by attacking them with a barrage of stones both at the pavillion and as they left the ground in their transport. James Allan ( now secretary of Albion) was one of 2 people to sustain serious injuries, a stone striking him in the eyeball.  





The Newcastle Courant 19.01.89


In the 1889-90 season Albion were disqualified from the FA Cup.  Having beaten Bootle 3-1 away, they faced a protest, which was upheld, that they had fielded ineligible players.  Unsurprisingly the 2 players involved were Scottish.
 Sawers was not registered with the club  and McKechnie was also deemed ineligible. I don't understand the rationale given by contemporary press reports that he was ineligible having 'played against Port Glasgow Athletic'.

Albion made unsuccessful attempts to join the Football League in 1889, 1890 and 1891. They withdrew their application in 1892. Their repeated failure to be elevated to a more lucrative level ultimately led to their demise in August 1892. 


Sunderland v Sunderland Albion, 1892.

In the weeks leading up to the 1892 meetings there was something of a thaw in relations between the clubs.  The chairman of Sunderland had attended an Albion match at Hendon, and Albion officials had travelled to watch Sunderland play Villa in the Cup semi final at Bramall Lane.


18.04.92
Sunderland

6
1

Sunderland Albion

Campbell, J. Hannah (3) , Miller,Smith
Gillespie

Newcastle Road , attendance 10,000


E. Doig
GK
W. Kirtley 
T. Porteous 
RB
J. Dewar
D. Gow
LB
J. Rae 
H. Wilson
RH
G. King
W.Gibson 
CH
W. Crozier
J. Murray
LH
P. McCracken 
J. Hannah
OR
J. Mackie 
J. Smith
IR
J. Gillespie
J.M Campbell
CF
R. Buchanan
J. Miller
IL
J. Strachan
D. Hannah
OL
J. Burns 

The press noted that former favorite 'Stonewall' Kirtley was given a particularly warm reception by the Sunderland supporters. He was, according to the Sunderland Echo, the only Sunderland man in either team. 
The second match was affected by bad weather, which kept the attendance down and also led to the game being played as 2 halves of 40 minutes each. 

27.04.92

Sunderland Albion

0

8

Sunderland


Scott (2), Campbell (3), J.Hannah, D. Hannah,?

Blue House Field Hendon, attendance 3,000



W. Kirtley

GK

E. Doig

J. Dewar

RB

T. Porteous

J. Rae

LB

J. Murray

G. King

RH

H. Wilson

W. Crozier

CH

J.R Auld

P. McCracken

LH

W.Gibson

J. Mackie

OR

J. Hannah

J. Gillespie

IR

D. Hannah

R. Buchanan

CF

J.M Campbell

J. Strachan

IL

J. Miller

J. Burns

OL

J. Scott



Sunderland Albion were financially dependent on their main backers, The Wear Glass Company. The Company itself was under pressure as a result of a workers' strike. In August 1892, having withdrawn their application to join the Football League, Albion's AGM decided to wind up the club. Their demise came in the summer that separated 2 League Championship winning seasons for Sunderland.







Ferencváros Xmas and New Year tour, 1911-12

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In 1911 December Ferencváros embarked on a tour that took them to Germany and England. The Budapest press was cynical about the tour, fearing that Ferencváros' reputation (and therefore the reputation of Hungarian football as a whole) would not be enhanced
5 of the party, including Imre Schlosser, joined in Munich, where they had been representing Hungary in a 4-1 win over Germany.
After 4 high scoring victories in Germany the Hungarians sailed to England where they were greeted by representatives of the FA and Vivian Woodward. the high point was considered a win over Woking in England. 
Woking had joined the Isthmian League that season (placing them among leading southern Amateurs such as West Norwood, Nunhead, Dulwich Hamlet and London Caledonians). Ferencváros took a 2-0 lead in heavy conditions, which were remarked to hamper the visitors' passing style. The game was ended prematurely due to theses adverse conditions. 

 Ferencváros lost their final match 4-1 against English Wanderers (a strong amateur selection featuring Olympians such as Berry, Hoare and Woodard) . The tourists were also guests at an amateur international in which England beat Wales 10-0.

Incidentally, the attendances for the 2 fixtures in England were not great- 800 at Woking and only 1000 at Stamford Bridge. 


Ferencváros at Woking

News of Ferencváros' successes had been warmly received in Budapest, and the team returned home to a triumphal reception. 

24.12.11
Viktoria Hamburg
3
5
Ferencváros
Hamburg
25.12.11
Bremen
0
5
Ferencváros
Bremen
30.12.11
Hertha BSC
2
4
Ferencváros
Berlin
01.01.12
BFC Preussen
2
7
Ferencváros
Berlin
08.01.12
Woking
2
3
Ferencváros
Woking
10.01.12
English Wanderers
4
1
Ferencváros
Stamford Bridge


P
W
D
L
F
A
6
5
0
1
25
13

Scorers:
Schlosser 9

Pataki 5

Weisz 2

Koródy  6

Borbás 2

1 own goal


William Ralf Dean - 60 goals

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0
A record that will never be broken.
During the course of the 1927-28 domestic season Bill Dean of Everton, known (to his displeasure) as Dixie, scored 60 League goals for Everton. He also scored 3 FA Cup goals and 4 goals in international friendlies.
During the record breaking season he scored 7 hattricks and was responsible for 58.8% of Everton's League goals (102).
Everton had sealed the championship before the final game , and 48,715 fans were at Goodison to watch the Arsenal match. Dean was on 57 goals. Arsenal went ahead after 2 minutes - Dean equalised a minute later, and in the 6th minute scored from the spot after he was fouled. The record-breaking  goal came in the 82nd minute, Dean heading in from a corner (a third of his 431 career goals were headed).


Football League Division One
Goal
27.08.27

Everton

4

0

The Wednesday

Goodison
1


Dean scored Everton’s 3rd.



03.09.27

Middlesbrough

4

2

Everton

Ayresome Park
2


1926-27 59 goal sensation George Camsell bagged all 4 of Boro’s goals.



05.09.27

Bolton Wanderers

1

1

Everton

Burnden Park
3




10.09.27

Everton

5

2

Birmingham

Goodison
5




14.09.27

Everton

2

2

Bolton Wanderers

Goodison
6




17.09.27

Newcastle United

2

2

Everton

St James’
8




24.09.27

Everton

2

2

Huddersfield Town

Goodison
10




01.10.27

Tottenham Hotspur

1

3

Everton

White Hart Lane
12




08.10.27

Everton

5

2

Manchester United

Goodison
17




15.10.27

Everton

1

1

Liverpool

Goodison


Dean’s first blank of the season, game 10.



29.10.27

Portsmouth

1

3

Everton

Fratton Park
20




05.11.27

Everton

7

1

Leicester City

Goodison
23








12.11.27

Derby County

0

3

Everton

Baseball Ground
25








19.11.27

Everton

0

1

Sunderland

Goodison








26.11.27

Bury

2

3

Everton

Gigg Lane
27








03.12.27

Everton

0

0

Sheffield United

Goodison








10.12.27

Aston Villa

2

3

Everton

Villa Park
30








17.12.27

Everton

4

1

Burnley

Goodison








24.12.27

Arsenal

3

2

Everton

Highbury
31








26.12.27

Everton

2

0

Cardiff City

Goodison
33


Dean’s previous best season tally was 32 (1925-26).

27.12.27

Cardiff City

2

0

Everton

Ninian Park








31.12.27

The Wednesday

1

2

Everton

Hillsborough
35








02.01.28

Blackburn Rovers

4

2

Everton

Ewood Park
37








07.01.28

Everton

3

1

Middlesbrough

Goodison
39


Dean passed Bert Freeman’s club record of 38 goals, set in the 1908-09 season.

        

21.01.28

Birmingham

2

2

Everton

St Andrew’s








04.02.28

Huddersfield Town

4

1

Everton

Leeds Road
40








11.02.28

Everton

2

5

Tottenham Hotspur

Goodison








25.02.28

Liverpool

3

3

Everton

Anfield
43








03.03.28

West Ham United

0

0

Everton

Boleyn Ground








14.03.28

Manchester United

1

0

Everton

Old Trafford








17.03.28

Leicester City

1

0

Everton

Filbert Street








24.03.28

Everton

2

2

Derby County

Goodison
45


The previous record for most goals in a First Division season was 43, scored by Ted Harper of Blackburn Rovers in 1925-26.



06.04.28

Everton

4

1

Blackburn Rovers

Goodison
47








07.04.28

Everton

1

1

Bury

Goodison
48








14.04.28

Sheffield United

1

3

Everton

Bramall Lane
50








18.04.28

Everton

3

0

Newcastle United

Goodison
51








21.04.28

Everton

3

2

Aston Villa

Goodison
53








24.04.28

Burnley

3

5

Everton

Turf Moor
57








05.05.28

Everton

3

3

Arsenal

Goodison
60


George Camsell scored 59 goals for Middlesbrough in Division 2 in 1926-27.




FA Cup

14.01.28

Preston North End

0

3

Everton

Deepdale
1








28.01.28

Arsenal

4

3

Everton

Highbury
3












Internationals

22.10.27

Ireland

2

0

England

Windsor Park








28.11.27

England

1

2

Wales

Turf Moor








31.03.28

England

1

5

Scotland

Wembley








17.05.28

France

1

5

England

Colombes
2








19.05.28

Belgium

1

3

England

Antwerp
4












Old Trafford 1910

0
0




The Manchester Courier, 21.02.10

Its not just teams and individual players that make up the rich fabric of football history, but places too, iconic venues.
Manchester United's Old Trafford ground is one of the great venues in World Football. 
Opened in 1910, Old Trafford was Manchester United / Newton Heath's 3rd home. 
From 1878  to 1893 Newton Heath played at North Road. The highest attendance recorded at this ground was approximately 15,000 for a Division 1 game against Sunderland (04.03.93).
The second ground was Bank Street. The capacity was 50,000. In the last match United played there, however, the attendance was just 5,000 (22.01.10).



The opening match at Old Trafford (19.02.10) drew a crowd in excess of 50,000.
In 1911 58,000 watched the replayed FA Cup Final between Bradford City and Newcastle United. Old Trafford's 2nd FA Cup Final, the Khaki Final of 1915 (Sheffield United v Chelsea) had an attendance of 49,557. 
70,504 saw United lose 3-1 to Aston Villa (27.12.20) and the ground's first international (England 0 Scotland 1, 17.04.26) was attended by a crowd of 

49,429.



Sandy Turnbull scored the first ever goal at Old Trafford, for United in a 4-3 loss to Liverpool. 

Shorts

0
0

The male stars of the 1920s certainly didn't wear shorts that brief, even in progressive Argentina. There was always an element of titillation and novelty around the coverage of the womens' game.

Racing Club de Tunis

0
0

Initially founded as Football Club de Tunis in 1904, Racing is Tunisia's oldest club.
The first league in Tunisia was inaugurated in 1907.
Initially 5 clubs participated: Racing Club de Tunis, Football Club de Tunis (not connected with the club of 1904), Sporting Club de Tunis, Lycée Carnot and Collège Sadiki (the last 2 were school sides).
During the following 2 years membership of the league changed, and no champion was decided until 1909. By this time the league had grown to 7 members , Sporting, Racing and Football being joined by Emile Loubet Club, S.C. Bizerte, Alliance Sportive and British Football Club.
Racing eventually emerged as champions, defeating Sporting in a play off.
Tunisian football lapses into obscurity then until 1920, when Racing won a precursor of the Coupe d'Afrique du Nord (contested by teams from Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco). No Tunisian side succeeded in official Coupe d'Afrique du Nord tournaments.
Racing won their domestic league in 1921-22, and were runners up to the splendidly named Avant Garde in the first edition of the Tunisian Cup in 1922-23.


Coppa Italia 1922

0
0
The Coppa Italia is a relatively new competition that just about comes into our pre 1937 view of World Football. Regular stagings date from 1935-36 (Torino were the winners, followed in 1936-37 by Genoa). 
Earlier editions of the Coppa had been held in 1926-27 and 1922.
In 1926-27 the competition had been abandoned due to fixture congestion. 111 entrants had been reduced to 34 with only Baracca Lugo, Pro Vercelli and Carpi through to the next round when the tournament was closed in June.
The first  Coppa had been played in 1922.
Italian domestic football at the time was a sprawling regionalised affair. 2 rival editions of the Prima Categoria featured no less than 105 clubs! The Coppa attracted 37 entrants, 23 from the Prima Categoria, 12 from Promozione (the 2nd tier) and 2 from Terza Categoria (3rd tier). 
The winners of the inaugural Coppa Italia were Vado. Founded in 1913 and based in the industrial port of Vado Ligure, 60 km from Genoa the club have spent the majority of their history in the 4th tier. In 1921-22 they were enjoying success in the Ligurian regional league.

The cup run was as follows:

02

.04.22
R1
Vado
4
3
Fiorente Genova
aet

09

.04.22
R2
Vado
5
1
Molassana

23.04.22

R3
Vado
2
0
Juventus Italia

18.06.22

QF
Pro Livorno
0
1
Vado

25.06.22
SF
Vado
1
0
Libertas Firenze
aet
15.07.22
Final
Vado
1
0
Udinese
aet

Levratto (center) 

The final was 0-0 at 90 minutes and the extra time was played on a 'golden goal ' basis. The light was failing and referee, Sgr. Pasquinelli was on the verge of calling a halt to proceedings when 17 year old Virgilio Levratto cut inside from the left, beat 2 men and sent a 20 yard rocket into the top left corner of the net. It was the 127th minute of the game.
Levratto went on to play for a number of top flight sides  (Hellas Verona , Genoa , Ambrosiana and Lazio ). 
He represented Italy 28 times scoring 11 goals and appeared at the 1924 and 1928 Olympics. 
Levratto was known as Sfondareti (“net breaker”) due to the venom of his shooting. He once knocked the Luxembourg goalkeeper out cold with a shot. 




Sunderland & Sunderland Albion

0
0
Albion
Sunderland AFC joined The Football League for the 1890–91 season, the first 'new' club (ie not one of the original 12- they replaced Stoke) to join since the  inauguration of the league in 1888. Their first 5 seasons in League football were a spectacular success:

1890–91- 7th
1891–92- champions
1892–93- champions
1893–94- 2nd
1894–95- champions
And yet, even as the seeds of this strength were being sown, there was a challenge to Sunderland's position as the principal team in the town. 
Sunderland had been founded in 1879 as Sunderland and District Teachers' Association Football Club, by James Allan, a Scotsman. Sunderland first played competitive football in 1884 (entering the FA Cup).
The 1888  a rift occurred between Sunderland and James Allan (who was by then club treasurer). Allan and a number of other members were disheartened by the way the club was developing. Something of a 'final straw' was the FA Cup tie with Middlesbrough in December 1887. Sunderland won the tie 4-2 in a thrilling replay but were subsequently disqualified for fielding players who did not meet the FA's stringent guidelines on the use of professionals. The players in question, Monaghan, Richardson and Hastings had recently been signed from Scotland, and did not meet the eligibility criteria. 
Charles Alcock issued a telegram on 29th December confirming Sunderland's expulsion. 



Sunderland Daily Echo 28.12.87


James Allan

James Allan was instrumental in the founding of a new club, Sunderland Albion, in March 1888. Several former Sunderland players were to feature for Albion.

Here is a summary of their rather short existence


Season

FA Cup

Football Alliance

Northern League

1888-89

R1



1889-90

R1 disq.

3rd


1890-91

R2

2nd

3rd

1891-92

R2


6th
Acknowledgements to F.C.H.D 

Sunderland v Sunderland Albion, 1888-89.

It could be argued that during this stage of Albion's existence the conduct of Sunderland was entirely designed to deprive their new neighbours of funds.  At this point Albion were still playing on an unenclosed ground ( at Blue House Field, one of Sunderland's former homes) and not charging admission. They needed funds to establish themselves commercially, and there was also a possibility that Albion could have taken over Newcastle Road. Sunderland delayed moving to their new ground for this very reason.

In December 1888 the teams were drawn to face each other in both the FA Cup (4th Qualifying Round) and the Durham County Cup. 
Sunderland withdrew from both competitions, claiming that they couldn't field a strong team, their Scottish professionals still being ineligible on residency grounds.
It is possible, however, that the refusal to play Albion was motivated by a reluctance to give them a good payday.
In fact, when public pressure led to the arrangement of 2 'friendlies' Sunderland would only play on the condition that the gate receipts went to charity.
The eagerly awaited matches took place in December 1888 and January 1889:

01.12.88 
Sunderland

2

0

Sunderland Albion

Davison, A.Peacock


Newcastle Road, attendance: c 15,000


W. Kirtley
GK
Angus
J. Oliver
RB
McFarlane
R. McDermid
LB
Munro
McKechnie
RH
Richardson
J. McLauchlan
CH
Moore
Gibson
LH
J. Stewart
J. Smith
OR
Kilpatrick
A. Davison
IR
S. Stewart
Breckonridge
CF
McClellan
W. Peacock
IL
Gloag
A. Peacock
OL
Hastings

This was Albion's first defeat in 14 games.
The second match was reportedly played for a trophy:

12.01.89

Sunderland

3

2

Sunderland Albion

uk, uk, Breckonridge

uk, uk,


Newcastle Road, attendance: c 10,000


Team unchanged.

Line up unknown but featured 2 loanees from Accrington- Barbour and Brand.


It was a controversial match that did nothing to reduce the ill feeling between the 2 parties.
Albion were 2-0 up at half time, but Sunderland rallied and drew level. With 2 minutes remaining Albion goalkeeper Angus made a clearance that cannoned off Breckonridge and, according to many witnesses, flew over the crossbar. Referee Mr Stacey of Sheffield awarded a goal (this was in the pre-net era of course). Albion's players left the field in protest. Mr Stacey waited until the 90 minutes was up and blew for time.
Supporters expressed their disapproval of Albion's conduct by attacking them with a barrage of stones both at the pavillion and as they left the ground in their transport. James Allan ( now secretary of Albion) was one of 2 people to sustain serious injuries, a stone striking him in the eyeball.  





The Newcastle Courant 19.01.89


In the 1889-90 season Albion were disqualified from the FA Cup.  Having beaten Bootle 3-1 away, they faced a protest, which was upheld, that they had fielded ineligible players.  Unsurprisingly the 2 players involved were Scottish.
 Sawers was not registered with the club  and McKechnie was also deemed ineligible. I don't understand the rationale given by contemporary press reports that he was ineligible having 'played against Port Glasgow Athletic'.

Albion made unsuccessful attempts to join the Football League in 1889, 1890 and 1891. They withdrew their application in 1892. Their repeated failure to be elevated to a more lucrative level ultimately led to their demise in August 1892. 


Sunderland v Sunderland Albion, 1892.

In the weeks leading up to the 1892 meetings there was something of a thaw in relations between the clubs.  The chairman of Sunderland had attended an Albion match at Hendon, and Albion officials had travelled to watch Sunderland play Villa in the Cup semi final at Bramall Lane.


18.04.92
Sunderland

6
1

Sunderland Albion

Campbell, J. Hannah (3) , Miller,Smith
Gillespie

Newcastle Road , attendance 10,000


E. Doig
GK
W. Kirtley 
T. Porteous 
RB
J. Dewar
D. Gow
LB
J. Rae 
H. Wilson
RH
G. King
W.Gibson 
CH
W. Crozier
J. Murray
LH
P. McCracken 
J. Hannah
OR
J. Mackie 
J. Smith
IR
J. Gillespie
J.M Campbell
CF
R. Buchanan
J. Miller
IL
J. Strachan
D. Hannah
OL
J. Burns 

The press noted that former favorite 'Stonewall' Kirtley was given a particularly warm reception by the Sunderland supporters. He was, according to the Sunderland Echo, the only Sunderland man in either team. 
The second match was affected by bad weather, which kept the attendance down and also led to the game being played as 2 halves of 40 minutes each. 

27.04.92

Sunderland Albion

0

8

Sunderland


Scott (2), Campbell (3), J.Hannah, D. Hannah,?

Blue House Field Hendon, attendance 3,000



W. Kirtley

GK

E. Doig

J. Dewar

RB

T. Porteous

J. Rae

LB

J. Murray

G. King

RH

H. Wilson

W. Crozier

CH

J.R Auld

P. McCracken

LH

W.Gibson

J. Mackie

OR

J. Hannah

J. Gillespie

IR

D. Hannah

R. Buchanan

CF

J.M Campbell

J. Strachan

IL

J. Miller

J. Burns

OL

J. Scott



Sunderland Albion were financially dependent on their main backers, The Wear Glass Company. The Company itself was under pressure as a result of a workers' strike. In August 1892, having withdrawn their application to join the Football League, Albion's AGM decided to wind up the club. Their demise came in the summer that separated 2 League Championship winning seasons for Sunderland.







Marcos Carneiro de Mendonça

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Marcos Carneiro de Mendonça was Brazil's first goalkeeper.
Marcos had featured in 3 games during the pre Seleção era, playing against Argentina (1912), Portugal (1913) and Corinthians (England) 1913. He also appeared in the match with Exeter City in 1914. At the time he was playing for América, winning the Campeonato Carioca in 1913. His first club had been the splendidly named Haddock Lobo.




When Brazil played their first official international (versus Argentina, 20.09.14) the elegant Marcos was again the goalkeeper of choice. By this time he had joined Fluminense. He played in 10 of Brazil's first 24 official matches (and another 5 unofficial games) retiring at the conclusion of the 1922 South American Championship. 


Marcos was a 4 time Campeonato Carioca winner and won the South American Championship with Brazil in 1919 and 1922.
Outside football he was an eminent historian specialising in Brazil in the 18th century, publishing works right up until his death, aged 93, in 1988. 



The Welsh Football Academy: T.E.Thomas and Chirk AAA

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 Chirk is a village between Wrexham and Oswestry close to the England Wales border. In 1891 the population was 2,272.
 Between 1884 and 1907 the village club, Chirk Amateur Athletic Association Football Club, provided 20 Welsh internationals , whilst another 4 natives of Chirk were capped whilst playing for other clubs. 
The club also won the Welsh Cup 5 times between 1887 and 1894. 
The success of the small mining community as a breeding ground for top class footballers is largely due to the efforts of one man, T.E. Thomas.

T.E. Thomas

Thomas was born in Ystalafera, South Wales in 1853. He was a schoolmaster at Chirk National School. 
In 1876 when the locals decided to form a club, Thomas was appointed secretary (he also played for the club, alongside employees of the local coal mines).
Thomas indoctrinated his pupils in the importance of accurate passing, ball control and keeping the ball on the ground. These were very progressive ideas at the time. 
In 1890 Thomas became became president of the Football Association of Wales.

Chirk AAA's Cup Winning teams: 

1886-87

1887-88

1889-90

1891-92

1893-94

E Povey
J Morgan
T Wynne
E Roberts
G O Postle
E Powell
'Di' Jones
J Mates
H Owen
J Jones
J Rogers
W P Jones
J Williams
J Owen
Wise
J Davies
R C Jones
G Williams
J Jones
E Morris
H Morgan
Billy Owen
P Griffiths
E James
T Williams
J Butler
W H Meredith
G Owen
H Morris
G Owen
H Roberts
G Griffiths
W Egan
A Lockley


Chirk AAA players in the Welsh International XI:

17.03.84

Wales 0 England 4 (Racecourse, Wrexham)

Charles Conde (1)

Peter Griffiths (2)

Billy Owen (3)


29.03.84

Scotland 4 Wales 1 (Cathkin Park, Glasgow)

Charles Conde




11.03.85

Ireland 2 Wales 8  (Ballynafeigh, Belfast)

Billy Owen




26.02.87

England 4 Wales 0 (The Oval)

Billy Owen




12.03.87

Ireland 4 Wales 1 (Oldpark Avenue, Belfast) 

George Griffiths (4)




04.02.88

England 5 Wales 1 (Nantwich Road, Crewe)

Peter Griffiths

Billy Owen


03.03.88

Wales 11 Ireland 0 (Racecourse, Wrexham)

Di Jones (5)




10.03.88

Scotland 5 Wales 1 (Easter Road, Edinburgh)

Di Jones

George Owen (6)


23.02.89

England 4 Wales 1 (Victoria Ground, Stoke)

Billy Owen




15.04.89

Wales 0 Scotland 0 (Racecourse, Wrexham)

Billy Owen




27. 04.89

Ireland 1 Wales 3  ( Ballynafeigh, Belfast)

Billy Owen




08.02.90

Wales 5 Ireland 2 (Old Racecourse, Shrewsbury)

Peter Griffiths

Billy Owen


22.03.90

Scotland 5 Wales 0 (Underwood Park, Paisley)

Peter Griffiths

Billy Owen


07.02.91

Ireland 7 Wales 2  (Ulsterville, Belfast)

Peter Griffiths

Jack Mates (7)

Joe Davies (8)

Billy Owen


07.03.91

England 4 Wales 1 (Newcastle Road, Sunderland)

Billy Owen




21.03.91

Wales 3 Scotland 4 (Racecourse, Wrexham)

Billy Owen




05.03.92

Wales 0 England 2 (Racecourse, Wrexham)

Billy Owen




26.03.92

Scotland 6 Wales 1 (Tynecastle, Edinburgh)

Billy Owen

William Egan (9)


13.03.93

England 6 Wales 0 (Victoria Ground, Stoke)

Edward Morris (10)

Edwin James (11)

Jack Butler (12)


18.03.93

Wales 0 Scotland 8 (Racecourse, Wrexham)

George Williams (13)

Edward Morris

Billy Owen

Jack Butler


08.04.93

Ireland 4 Wales 3  (Cliftonville Ground, Belfast)

Edward Morris

Billy Owen

Jack Butler

George Owen

Edwin James


24.02.94

Wales 4 Ireland 1 (St Helen’s Swansea)

Edwin James




12.03.94

Wales 1 England 5 (Racecourse, Wrexham)

Edwin James




24.03.94

Scotland 5 Wales 2 (Rugby Park, Kilmarnock)

George Williams

Edwin James



16.03.95

Ireland 2 Wales 2 (Solitude, Belfast)

George Williams




18.03.95

England 1 Wales 1 (Queen’s Club, London)

George Williams




23. 03.95

Wales 2 Scotland 2 (Racecourse, Wrexham)

George Williams




20.03.97

Wales 2 Scotland 2 (Racecourse, Wrexham)

Jack Mates




29.03.97

England 4 Wales 0 (Bramall Lane, Sheffield)

Jack Mates




19.02.98

Wales 0 Ireland 1 (The Oval, Llandudno)

John Morris (14)

George Williams

Albert Lockley (15)


19.03.98

Scotland 5 Wales 2 (Fir Park, Motherwell)

Edwin James


28.03.98

Wales 0 England 3 (Racecourse, Wrexham)

Edwin James




04. 03.99

Ireland 1 Wales 0 (Grosvenor Park, Belfast)

Edwin James




03.02.1900

Scotland 5 Wales 2 (Pittodrie, Aberdeen)

Charlie Morris  (16)

Sam Meredith (17)


24.02.1900

Wales 2 Ireland 0 (The Oval, Llandudno)

Charlie Morris

Robert Morris (18)




02.03.01

Wales 1 Scotland 1 (Racecourse, Wrexham)

Sam Meredith




18.03.01

England 6 Wales 0 (St James's Park, Newcastle)

Sam Meredith




23.03.01

Ireland 0 Wales 1 (Solitude, Belfast)

Sam Meredith

Robert Morris


15.03.02

Scotland 5 Wales 1 (Cappielow Park, Greenock)

Robert Morris




28. 03.03

Ireland 2 Wales 0 (Solitude, Belfast)

William Wynn (19)




23.02.07

Ireland 2 Wales 3 (Solitude, Belfast)

Arthur H Hughes (20)





The rise of professionalism in the 1880's saw an increased movement of players away from the villages of North East Wales into the North West of England and the Midlands. Examples among the players listed are Joe Davies, who moved on to Everton, and Di Jones, later of Bolton Wanderers and Manchester City. 
In addition to the 20 players above, the following Chirk players gained international honours whilst playing for other clubs: 

Jack Owen (Newton Heath) brother of Billy Owen, 1 cap (1892).

Hugh Morris (Chirk, Ardwick, Sheff Utd, Manchester City, Grimsby Town) 3 appearances for Wales (1894–97).

Billy  Meredith (Chirk, Northwich Victoria, Manchester City, Manchester United) 48 Wales caps (1895–1920).

Lot Jones (Chirk, Druids, Manchester City) 20 Wales caps  (1905–20).





Finland 1912

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Up until 1917 the Grand Duchy of Finland (Великое княжество Финляндское) was a part of the Russian Empire. The Head of State was the Emperor of Russia (Nikolai II), under the title Grand Duke of Finland.  Finland did, however, enjoy a certain amount of autonomy.
In the sporting domain Finland joined FIFA in 1908 (though they didn't play an international until 1911) and Russia joined in 1912.
Finland had played 2 friendlies prior to the 1912 Olympics, both heavy defeats (5-2 and 7-1) to Sweden in October 1911 and June 1912. 
2 days after the defeat to Sweden in Stockholm Finland played their first competitive international. Their opponents were Italy (7 previous internationals and 1 victory). 
Watched by a modest crowd of 600, the match was refereed by Herr Hugo Meisl. 
20 year old Jarl Öhman put the Finns ahead in the 2nd minute. By the 25th minute Italy had taken a 2-1 lead. Eino Soinio, Finland's 17 year old captain, equalized in the 40th minute.There were no goals in the 2nd half. Extra time saw a Bror Wiberg goal (105') secure the win for Finland.
Next up was a 2nd round match with Russia, played the following day (30.06.12) at 10:00 am! Finland made only one change, and even Wickström, who had missed the 2nd half of the Italy game with an injury, played less than 24 hrs later.A crowd of 2-300 saw goals from Wiberg and Öhman give Finland a 2-1 win.
This set up a semi final against Great Britain (England Amateurs)- an unenviable prospect as England Amateurs had only lost 1 game in the previous 6 years and routinely posted double figure scores.
Finland fell behind to a 2nd minute own goal. Bradford City's Harold Walden added a 2nd goal in the 7th minute. Finland then put in a respectable appearance and it wasn't until the 77th minute that Walden scored a 3rd. Inevitably Vivian Woodward got a goal as Great Britain won 4-0. 


Jarl 'Lali'Öhman

 Eino Soinio

This left the Finns with one more game to contest- a play off for the bronze medal against The Netherlands. 
Netherlands were coached by England veteran Edgar Chadwick, There was no scoring in the first quarter, but then Netherlands, and Jan Vos in particular, ran riot. It was 4-0 at the break and Netherlands ran out 9-0 winners, with Vos getting 5.

Finland only played one more international before the outbreak of the war in 1914, losing 4-3 to Sweden in Stockholm (24.05.14).





Football Post

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0




































Nottingham Evening Post, 1905

Ray Braine

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0

Up until 1930 the way in which Belgian clubs got around the strict amatuer rules was to set their players up as cafe owners. Ray Braine, who had won 4 championships with Beerschot (Antwerp), scoring 141 goals in 142 games in his 8 year spell at the club, followed this route. The Belgian Federation then introduced a  rule that banned players from being cafe proprietors unless their parents had been in the business for 5 years.  
In 1930 Braine decided to try his hand abroad in order to earn money from football without resorting to subterfuge, He was set to join London club Clapton Orient, but the British government operated a very strict control on foreign labour, and would not consider allowing a foreign national to enter the country to work as a professional footballer. 
Braine turned instead to Czechoslovakia, joining Sparta Prague. He was very successful in Prague, winning 2 league championships and a Mitropa Cup. The Czechs offered him a small fortune to adopt Czech citizenship, but he declined, returning to Belgium in 1936.
He made 54 appearances for the national team, scoring 26 goals

Associação de Futebol de Lisboa - Brazil 1913

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0


Some team photographs of the Portuguese XI taken during their visit to Brazil. 

In 1913 Botafogo moved into their new ground, Estádio General Severiano. The first game at the stadium was played on 13.05.13, a 1-0 win over Flamengo with a goal from Mimi Sodre.
Botafogo were keen to celebrate the acquisition of their new home with a special eve. This is what prompted them (in 1912) to invite the Football Association of Lisbon to send a touring party to Rio. The arrangements were handled by journalist Duarte Rodrigues of Lisbon's Tiro e Sport magazine.
Football in Portugal was amatuer and the trip required a large commitment in terms of time and expense. 
Several players who would have featured on merit were unavailable. The Football Association of Lisbon assembled the following squad for the tour: 


GK
Eduardo Luís Pinto Basto (secretary)
Internacional
HB
Boaventura Belo
Internacional
F
João Bentes

Sporting
D
Henrique Costa
Benfica
D
Amadeu Cruz
Sporting
HB
Cosme Damião  (captain)
Benfica
F
José Domingos Fernandes
Benfica
D/HB
Carlos Figueiredo
Benfica
F/ HB
Álvaro Gaspar
Benfica
F
Artur José Pereira
Benfica
F
Cândido Rosa Rodrigues
Sporting
GK
Augusto Paiva Simões
Benfica
F
Carlos Sobral
Internacional
F
António Stromp
Sporting
F
Francisco Stromp
Sporting
F
Luís Vieira
Benfica


Cosme Damião 

Liga Metropolitana XI ('Brazil') 17.07.13


Botafogo 1913

13.07.13

British XI

(Rio Cricket/ Paysandu)
3

1

Portugal XI

Estádio General Severiano, Rio de Janeiro

14.07.13

Combinado Carioca

1

0

Portugal XI

17.07.13

Brazil XI

(Liga Metropolitana de Sports Atléticos)

0

0

Portugal XI

20.07.13

Botafogo

0

1

Portugal XI

24.07.13

Palmeiras

2

2

Portugal XI

Velódromo de São Paulo

25.07.13
Mackenzie

5

1

Portugal XI

27.07.13

Paulistano

0

1

Portugal XI




P
W
D
L
F
A
7
2
2
3
6
11
Goals: Artur José Pereira (3), Carlos Sobral (2) , António Stromp (1) 

Botafogo vs Portuguese XI


Paulistano 27.07.13



Vieira
Benfica's Luis Vieira stayed on in Rio and  played for Botafogo, their first overseas player.

He remained in Brazil until 1916.






A humiliation that staggered the football world: Swansea Town v Blackburn Rovers- 1915

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On Saturday Swansea City travel to Blackburn Rovers in the 4th round of The FA Cup.
When the 2 met in January 1915 for a first round FA Cup tie, the outcome was one of the biggest upsets in the history of British football. 
Blackburn Rovers were a big, big club. Established 40 years previously they were founding members of The Football League. The previous season Rovers had won the Championship (their 2nd title).  They had won the FA Cup 5 times. At the time of this match (09.01.15) they were 5th in Division 1.
Their line up featured 4 England internationals ( Crompton, Bradshaw, Latheron and Hodkinson) and 1 Scottish international ( Aitkenhead).
Crompton had played for England a remarkable 41 times ( a record which stood for 38 years), captaining on 21 occasions. 
Rovers offered Swansea a large sum to switch the match to Ewood Park but the offer was declined and 16,000 people were at the Vetch to see the League champions. 
Swansea Town were in the second division of the Southern League. They had only come into existence in 1912. Their line up that day was light on stars. Club captain Thomas Hewitt had played for Wales 8 times (1911-14). Captain for cup matches that season was Joe Bulcock The man who became a hero that day was a 16 year old Rugby player. Benny Benyon was only playing 'soccer' because Rugby was suspended during the war. 
Blackburn attacked relentlessly from the outset, but in the 20th minute Swansea broke out of defence in a move, started and finished by Beynon, that covered the length of the pitch and gave the Swans an unlikely lead. 
At half time Swansea were reduced to 10 men when Lock was injured. 
Rovers bombarded the Swans goal in the 2nd half. They were awarded a penalty but remarkably Billy Bradshaw, who had scored with 36 consecutive spot kicks, shot wide. Harry Read went off injured and Swansea had to hold out for the last quarter of an hour with just 9 men. 
It was, according to  contemporary newspaper reports: A humiliation that staggered the football world.
As the photograph shows, Swansea Town were unique in having a strip in which jersey and knickers were of the same colour.
Benny Beynon returned to Rugby after the war and played for Wales, but in a ruling that highlights the stupidity of the way in which that game was administered, he was banned for professionalism on account of his Association football exploits. He went to Oldham as a Northern Union player.
Joe Bulcock (Town) and Eddie Latheron (Rovers) were both killed in the war.

Swansea Town

Blackburn Rovers
Hurst
GK
Alf Robinson
Tom Hewitt
RB
Bob Crompton
Joe Bulcock
LB
Tommy Suttie
John Duffy
RH
Bert Walmsley
Lock
CH
Percy Smith
Anderson
LH
Billy Bradshaw
Harry Read
OR
Alex McGhie
Brown
IR
Wattie Aitkenhead
Benny Beynon
CF
Johnny Orr
Gilboy
IL
Eddie Latherton
Amos Lloyd
OL
Joe Hodkinson


Alcántara for Spain

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Paulino Alcántara first represented Catalunya as an 18 year old in 1915. He also represented the Philippines in the 1917 Far Eastern Games. It is likely that he played in all 3 of the Philippines' games, the last of which was abandoned due to fighting.
On returning to Europe he continued to represent Catalunya.
He would have been expected to represent Spain when they made their entry into international football at the 1920 Olympics, but he was unavailable due to his medical studies.
 Alcántara made his Spain debut in 1921. He played 5 internationals, scoring 6 goals:







09.10.21
Spain
2
0
Belgium
Bilbao
Alcántara captained Spain on his debut and scored both goals (55 & 80 min)


18.12.21
Spain
3
1
Portugal
Madrid
Alcántara scored Spain’s 2nd and 3rd  (23 & 50 min)


20.04.22
France
0
4
Spain
Bordeaux
Captain for the 2nd time, Alcántara scored the 2 opening goals (20 & 27 min)


04.02.23
Belgium
1
0
Spain
Antwerp

16.12.23
Spain
3
0
Portugal
Seville
Alcántara was captain, Español’s Zabala scored all 3 goals.







Sport-Magazin - August 1935

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0

 Ferencváros lost  to Sparta in the Mitropa Cup final the month after this magazine appeared. They were runners up in the Hungarian league in the 1934-35 season, and won the Magyar Kupa.
This was the team, consisting of  11 Hungary internationals, that lined up in the semi final of the Mitropa Cup against Austria Vienna. 
Kronenberger was also known as Lajos Korányi. 
I really like József Háda's goalkeeper's jersey.

Fixtures 1869-70

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A fixture list of metropolitan matches from Bell’s Life in London and Sporting Chronicle (27.11. 1869). No distinction is made between the codes. In an exoticism sadly lost from the Association game,  Wasps, Owls and Flamingoes  feature alongside Pirates, Gipsies and Gitanoes.
Several of these clubs featured in the early years of the FA Cup. The legendary Wanderers were playing their home fixtures at The Oval cricket ground ( courtesy of Mr Alcock). CCC (Civil Service), Barnes and Royal Engineers still play. The Crystal Palace name survives, but it is an entirely different club. 


Copa Julio Roca

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A very dapper Brazil -winners in 1914. Goalkeepers are different- Marcos sports a bow tie. 

Copa Julio Roca was a very irregular competition in which Brazil played Argentina for a succession of different trophies.
During 'our' era (pre Northern Hemisphere summer 1937) it was contested 3 times.

1914
Argentina 0 Brazil 1
27.09.14 at Club Gimnasia y Esgrima, Buenos Aires. Attendance 17,000.
The Argentina side represented a dissident association, but FIFA recognizes the match as an official international (as does Brazil).
Rubens Salles scored the winner in the 13th minute.

Argentina

Brazil

Juan José Rithner

Porteño

Marcos
Fluminense
Diómedes Bernasconi

Estudiantes de La Plata

Píndaro
Flamengo
 Carlos Galup Lanús

Estudiantes de La Plata

Nery
Flamengo
Ricardo Naón

Estudiantes de La Plata

Lagreca
AA São Bento
Ernesto Sande

Independiente

Rubens Salles 
Paulistano
Santiago Sayanes

Gimnasia y Esgrima

Pernambuco
Fluminense
Juan José Lamas

Estudiantes de La Plata

Millon 
Paulistano
Roberto Leonardi

Estudiantes de La Plata

Oswaldo Gomes 
Fluminense
Antonio Piaggio

Club Atlético Atlanta

Barthô
Fluminense
Carlos Izaguirre

Colombia

Friedenreich
Ypiranga
Francisco Crespo

Tigre

Arnaldo
Paulistano

1922
Brazil 2-1 Argentina
22.10.22 at  Parque Antarctica, São Paulo.  Attendance  15.000
Francia put Argentina ahead after 17 minutes.
Two second half strikes from Gambarotta (aka Gamba) won it for the hosts.


Brazil

Argentina
Mesquita 
Mack--Portuguesa

Américo Tesoriere
Boca Juniors

Grané
Corinthians de Jundiai

Adolfo Celli
Newell's Old Boys

Clodô 
Paulistano

Pedro Castoldi
Sportivo Barracas

Abatte
Paulistano

Alfredo Chabrolín
Newell's Old Boys

Faragassi 
Ypiranga

Ángel Médici
Boca Juniors

Nesi
São Cristóvão

Emilio Solari
Nueva Chicago

Leite de Castro 
Botafogo

Julio Rivet
Club Del Plata

sub Brasileiro
Minas Gerais

Ángel Chiessa
Huracán

Zezé
Fluminense

José Gaslini
Alvear

Gambarotta 
Corinthians

Juan Francia
Rosario Central

Tepet
Ypiranga

Marcelo de Césari
Boca Juniors

Osses 
Ypiranga






The crowd at Parque Antarctica- a well turned out bunch.

1923
Argentina 2-0 Brazil
09.12.23 at Campo do Barracas Buenos Aires.  
Dino scored an own goal, Cesareo Onzari got the second.


Argentina

Brazil

Américo Tesoriere
Boca Juniors

Nélson
Vasco da Gama

Ludovico Bidoglio
Boca Juniors

Pennaforte
Flamengo

Juan Carlos Iribarren
Argentinos Jrs

Alemão
Botafogo

Ángel Médici
Boca Juniors

Mica
Botafogo Bahia

Roberto Seregni
Racing Club de Avellaneda

sub Soda
Americano Campos

Emilio Solari
Nueva Chicago

Nesi
São Cristóvão

Adán Loizo
Huracán

Dino
Flamengo

Antonio Cerrotti
Boca Juniors

Paschoal
Vasco da Gama

Domingo Tarasconi
Boca Juniors

Zezé
Fluminense

Ángel Chiessa
Huracán

Nilo 
Brasil

Cesareo Onzari
Huracán

Coelho
Fluminense



Amaro 
Goytacaz




Onzari