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  • 12/03/14--13:03: Tiverton Preedy
  • Thanks to the philosophy of Muscular Christianity and the missionary attitude that many Victorian Christians had towards the proletariat, churches and chapels were often the focus of football clubs in industrial cities and towns.
    Bolton Wanderes and Everton were examples amongst the original members of the Football League; Manchester City can trace their origins to a church team.


    Barnsley

    Barnsley are another club who owe their existence to a man of the cloth.
    Tiverton Preedy had direct links with the Muscular Christianity ethos. He studied at Lincoln Theological College - an institution founded by a former Rugby Schoolmaster, Edward Benson.
    Rev. Preedy took his belief that sport was a useful means of providing moral education to Barnsley in 1887.  Barnsley was  predominantly a Rugby town, and  Rev. Preedy originally  played Rugby, but when he left the Rugby club in protest at their playing a match on Good Friday, he turned his attentions to Association. 
    Rev. Preedy was a curate at St Peter's, and the club he formed carried the name of the church. The fixture lists of the north of England at this time are full of Saints and Holy Trinities. 


    A generous friend to the poor...

    Having graduated through the Sheffield and District League and the Midland League Barnsley were elected to The Football League in 1898.
    They reached the FA Cup Final in 1910, losing to Newcastle United. In 1912 Barnsley lifted the FA Cup, beating West Bromwich Albion 1-0 in a replayed Final at Bramall Lane. The club presented the match ball to Rev. Preedy. 



    Sarah Briggs from Barnsley Council and Arthur Bower, Barnsley FC historian, with the match ball from the 1912 FA Cup Final.
      Barnsley Chronicle 08.06.13



    101 years previously- the same ball is booted away by Barnsley's Dick Downs. 



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  • 12/04/14--12:15: Working class hero?
  •  The focus of early Association football was exclusive- the preserve of young men, likely ex Public Schoolboys and university men of independent means. 
    According to our research 27 players represented England before a 'working man' was included in the line up.
    The schools/clubs/university affiliations of most of the players from the early days reveal their upper class backgrounds. Further insight is gleaned from their father's occupations and the professions that the players themselves pursued (often later than their footballing careers). Let's see:


    Game


     school or college
    1

    Robert Barker

      Westminster


    Father was a rector, he was a civil engineer.


    1

    Harwood Greenhalgh



    Father Lace Manufacturer, he managed a cotton factory.


    1

    Reginald Courtenay Welch

     Harrow


    Followed his father into the law.


    1

    Frederick Chappell

     Marlborough, Oxford University


    Followed his father into the law.


    1

    William J Maynard



    Legal clerk.


    1

    John Brockbank

     Shrewsbury, Cambridge University


    Actor.


    1

    Charlie Clegg



    Solicitor.


    1

    Cuthbert Ottaway

     Eton, Oxford University


    Son of a surgeon, Ottaway became a barrister.


    1

    Charles Chenery



    Articled to solicitors.


    1

    Kirke Smith

     Cheltenham College, Oxford University


    Father was a solicitor and farmer- he was at Oxford University and went into the church.


    1

    Charles John Morice

     Harrow


    Stockbroker, as was his father.


    2

    Alexander Morton



    Member of the stock exchange.


    2

    Leonard Howell

     Winchester College


    Malt Factor.


    2

    Lieut. Alfred G Goodwyn

     Royal Military Academy


    From a military family and an officer in the Royal Engineers.


    2

    Walpole Vidal

    Westminster, Oxford University


    Went into the church.


    2

    Lieut. Pelham von Donop

    Royal Military Academy


    An officer in the Royal Engineers.


    2

    William Clegg



    Solicitor.


    2

    Alexander Bonsor

     Eton


    A brewer by trade, a director of Combe & Co., the family business.


    2

    Hubert Heron



    Commercial clerk.


    2

    William Kenyon-Slaney

    Eton , Oxford University


    From a military family, an officer in the Grenadier Guards. His proper title in later life-The Right Honorable Colonel William Slaney Kenyon-Slaney MP.


    3

    Robert Ogilvie

    Brentwood School


    A member of Lloyds.


    3

    Alfred Hugh Stratford

    Malvern College


    No occupations recorded.

    3

    Francis Birley

    Winchester College, Oxford University


    Barrister.


    3

    Charles Wollaston

    Lancing College, Oxford University


    Solicitor.



    3

    Robert Kingsford

    Marlborough College


    His father was a solicitor, Robert lived on independent means.


    3

    J Hawley Edwards



    Solicitor.

    3

    John Owen

    Oxford University


    Schoolmaster and clergyman.


    What a profusion of lawyers! And then, in England's 4th international (06.03.75) William Henry Carr was one of six new 'caps' (an anachronism here). 


    4
    William Carr



    A Metalsmith.


    4
    Edward Haygarth

    Lancing College

    Solicitor.



    4
    William Rawson

    Westminster, Oxford University

    Oxford schoolmaster, Electrical Engineer.


    4
    Charlie Alcock

    Harrow

    Sports journalist and administrator.


    4
    Herbert Rawson



    An officer in the Royal Engineers.


    4
    Cpt.Richard Geaves

    Harrow

    An army officer.






    Carr played for a number of Sheffield clubs and also represented the Sheffield Association. He was with Owlerton when he made his only international appearance, in which he came on 15 minutes late! He is described variously as A Metalsmith, a white metal smith and later a silversmith.  

    Carr's fellow Sheffielder BillyMosforth (one of seven who became the 43rd players to represent England in match #6, 03.03.77) is often cited as being England's first working class player, and he was undoubtedly a professional footballer. However, Jimmy Forrest is generally regarded as being the first professional footballer to represent England, although he was 'among others' from the leading Lancashire clubs who were representing England during the period when professionalism was sanctioned by the FA.




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  • 12/06/14--05:35: 28.05.88
  • It would appear as if the newly-formed Glasgow club, the Celtic F.C., has a bright future before it. At any rate, if the committee can place the same eleven in the field as opposed the Rangers last Monday evening, or an equally strong one, the Celtic will not lack for patronage and support. 
    The Scottish Umpire 05.06.88


    Celtic played their first match on 28th May 1888. The opponents, a team called The Swifts, were a Glasgow Rangers XI. Celtic won by 5-2. 

    The club had assembled a team that comprised both young Lanarkshire talent and established players of some repute. Professionalism was outlawed in Scottish football, but some of these players were undoubtedly paid to play and rewarded for signing on. The 11 featured 3 players who had previously represented Scotland (Kelly, McCallum and Dunbar ) . 7 were born in Scotland, 2 in Ireland and 2 in England. The average age was 22.
     Here is the line up:

    Goalkeeper:  Mick Dolan (Drumpellier) 19

    Dolan joined the newly formed club from Coatbridge's Drumpellier FC . The town of Coatbridge is noted for its strong Irish connections. Most of Dolan's career with Celtic was spent in the reserve team.

    Right back: Eddie Pearson (Carfin Shamrock) 25
    Pearson returned to Carfin Shamrock shortly after the establishment of Celtic. 

    Left back: James McLaughlin (Hibernian) 23

    McLaughlin became Celtic's first choice goalkeeper during his 2 years at the club. He was later a top class referee.

    Right half: Willie Maley (Cathcart) 20
    Willie Maley, a legend in the game, joined Celtic  by chance. A party  went to the Maley family home in Cathcart to ask Tom to join the new club. Tom was visiting his girlfriend,  Willie was at home. The visitors (Brother Walfrid was present) suggested that  Willie should also join Celtic.  Willie was at Celtic for 9 seasons as a player, winning 3 Scottish League Championships (1892-93, 1893-94, 1895-96) and the Scottish FA Cup (1892). He made 2 international appearances for Scotland in 1893. He then managed the club for 43 years, winning 30  trophies.


    Centre half: James Kelly (Renton) 22

    Kelly was Celtic's big signing. One of the leading players of his day and a World Championship winner with Renton. Controversy surrounded his signing, as inducements and payments were undoubtedly involved.  Kelly went on to play 139 games for Celtic, winning the Cup and League in the process. He was also capped by Scotland. He later served as a director and as chairman of the club.

    Left half: Phil Murray (Cambuslang Hibs) 22

    Murray was an Englishman who later emigrated to the United States. 

    Outside right: Neil McCallum (Renton) 19
    The Shadow scored Celtic's first ever goal. Another Renton star lured to the club.He later played for Blackburn Rovers and Nottingham Forest as well as guesting for Glasgow Rangers. 

    Inside right:  Tom Maley  (Cathcart) 23

    Handsome Tom was another coup signing. A player (and all round athlete) of great repute. He later enjoyed some success in management. 

    Centre forward: John 'Jake' Madden (Dumbarton) 22

    Jake 'The Rooter' Madden, a shipyard worker and professional footballer (though no such thing existed officially in Scotland at the time) appeared in the inaugural celtic game in transit from Grimsby Town back to his hometown club, Dumbarton. In 2 spells with the Celts he played 118 games and scored 49 goals. He was capped twice by Scotland, scoring 5 international goals. 
    Madden then made a huge contribution to the evolution of football in Czechoslovakia, coaching Slavia Prague for 25 years


    Inside left:. Mick.Dunbar ( Hibernian ) 24

    Capped for Scotland in 1886 when he was with Cartvale. Was at Celtic for 5 years, making 32 first team appearances. 


    Outside left: Charlie Gorevin (Govan Whitefield) 24

    An Irishman who later emigrated to the USA where he played both Gaelic and Association football.



    Celtic's scorers were McCallum, Kelly and Tom Maley (3).

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  • 12/07/14--11:41: Copa de Honor Cousenier
  • This competition was established by the Cousenier (Cusenier) Liqueur Company, who provided the trophy. 
    Argentina was represented by the winners of the Copa de Honor Municipalidad de Buenos Aires (Buenos Aires/ Rosario) and Uruguay by the winners of the Uruguayan Copa de Honor.
    The final was played in Montevideo. In one exceptional case (1914) the trophy was contested by 2 Uruguayan teams.


    10.09.05
    U
    Nacional
    3
    2
    Alumni
    A
    16.09.06
    A
    Alumni
    2
    2
    Nacional
    U
    14.10.06
    A
    Alumni
    3
    1
    Nacional
    U
    20.10.07
    A
    Belgrano Ath
    2
    1
    CURCC*
    U
    20.11.08
    U
    Wanderers
    2
    0
    Quilmes
    A
    17.10.09
    U
    CURCC
    4
    2
    San Isidro
    A
    1910
    Not contested
    05.11.11
    U
    CURCC
    2
    0
    Newell's Old Boys
    A
    08.12.12
    U
    River Plate
    2
    1
    Racing Club
    A
    16.11.13
    A
    Racing Club
    1
    1
    Nacional
    U
    08.12.13
    A
    Racing Club
    3
    2
    Nacional
    U
    06.12.14
    U
    Nacional
    1
    0
    Peñarol
    U
    14.11.15
    U
    Nacional
    2
    0
    Racing Club
    A
    10.12.16
    U
    Nacional
    6
    1
    Rosario Central
    A
    31.04.18
    U
    Nacional
    3
    1
    Racing Club
    A
    01.12.18
    U
    Peñarol
    4
    0
    Independiente
    A
    20.09.23
    A
    Boca Juniors
    2
    0
    Universal
    U

    *CURCC became Peñarol in 1913



    Nacional 1905 

    Alumni 1906



    0 0
  • 12/08/14--13:47: Sheffield v Newark, 1869

  • Nottinghamshire Guardian 10.12.69

    Further evidence of the rather shambolic state of football in the 1860s. Newark short handed, unscientific in their play and a lack of clarity regarding the code.
    We were somewhat surprised to find them not playing the Football Association Rules, inasmuch as the Sheffield Club are members of the Association... this comment by the (Nottingham) reporter reveals the confusion that persisted 6 years after the FA had set out to standardise the laws of the game. Sheffield, of course, was something of a special case- the Sheffield Association observed their own code of rules as they converged with those of the Football Association, eventually unifying  in 1878.
    Newark Town, currently of the Central Midlands Football League: North Division proudly display the foundation year of 1868 on their club crest. 

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    In 1903 The South African Football Association re affiliated with the Football Association in a gesture of reconciliation following the recent war between the Colonies and the United Kingdom*.  The following year the Argentinian association became affiliates. Ambitiously the Argentinians sought to establish a triangular tournament , to be played in Buenos Aires, with South Africa and Fulham as the guest teams.
    This plan never reached fruition, but South Africa did send a team to Argentina in 1906. The Argentina FA footed the bill and the tourists embarked on a 27 day voyage from Cape Town to Southampton and then on to Buenos Aires as no direct sailings were available.
    The tour gives us some insight into the relative strengths of footballing nations at the time.
    According to their captain Henry Heeley the height of ambition for any South African footballer would be to be invited to play in England, however South African teams had suffered such beatings at the hands of Corinthians that they were reluctant to face English opposition (there was relief that Fulham were not sailing to Argentina). South Africa were, however,  far superior to their South American opponents. Contemporary Argentinian press reports speak in glowing terms of the methods employed by the tourists- short passing, unselfish combination and above all clean play. The press  emphasized the gentlemanly manners and conduct of the 'Representatives of the Dark Continent'.
    The players were exclusively white, strictly amateur, and typically civil servants, government employees, bankers and civil engineers. Seven of the 15 players were born in South Africa and 8 originated from England and Scotland.


    ??.06.06
    San Martin
    0
    6
    South Africa
    Sociedad Sportiva Argentina, B.A.
    22.06.06
    Universitarios
    0
    14
    South Africa
    Sociedad Sportiva Argentina, B.A.
    24.06.06
    Alumni
    1
    0
    South Africa
    Sociedad Sportiva Argentina, B.A.
    29.06.06
    Belgrano AC
    0
    6
    South Africa
    Sociedad Sportiva Argentina, B.A.
    01.07.06
    Liga Rosario XI
    0
    9
    South Africa
    Rosario
    08.07.06
    British XI
    1
    4
    South Africa
    Sociedad Sportiva Argentina, B.A.
    09.07.06
    Argentinos
    0
    1
    South Africa
    Sociedad Sportiva Argentina, B.A.
    12.07.06
    CA Estudiantes
    2
    3
    South Africa
    Sociedad Sportiva Argentina, B.A.
    15.07.06
    Argentina League XI
    1
    4
    South Africa
    Sociedad Sportiva Argentina, B.A.
    18.07.06
    Uruguay League XI
    1
    6
    South Africa
    Montevideo
    22.07.06
    Alumni
    0
    2
    South Africa
    Sociedad Sportiva Argentina, B.A.
    ??.07.06
    Quilmes
    0
    6
    South Africa
    Quilmes
    31.07.06
    Paulistas
    0
    6
    South Africa
    São Paulo

    The only 'home win', Alumni's victory in the first meeting, watched by a crowd in excess of 12,000, including the President, was hailed as a national triumph.

    Harold James  Henman, an English born member of the party who had also played for South Africa against Corinthians in 1903, stayed on in Argentina, and as "Héctor" Henman played for Alumni  and the national team.



    * The original affiliation in 1897 saw the  SAFA basing a representative in London.


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  • 12/12/14--03:06: Ireland 1914
  • Ireland, the last of the 4 'Home Nations' to enter the International arena, had been the perennial whipping boys of the British Home Championship in the early days,
     In 1903 they shared first place with Scotland and England (all 3 finished the campaign with 2 wins and a defeat) and in 1913 enjoyed their first victory over England.


    They won their first British Home Championship in 1914.



                                                                                v Wales

    19.01.14

    Wales  1 Ireland 2

    Racecourse, Wrexham

    GK

    Fred McKee

    Belfast Celtic



    RB

    Bill McConnell

    Bohemians



    LB

    Sandy  Craig (c)

    Greenock Morton



    RH

    Val Harris

    Everton

    Off injured at 45


    CH

    Pat O'Connell

    Hull City



    LH

    Dave Rollo

    Linfield


    OR

    Ted Seymour

    Bohemians



    IR

    Sam Young

    Linfield


    CF

    Billy Gillespie

    Sheffield United

    25, 65


    IL

    Billy Lacey

    Liverpool



    OL

    Louis Bookman

    Bradford City



    Coach: R Bennett




    14.02.14

    England 0 Ireland 3

    Ayresome Park, Middlesbrough

    GK

    Fred McKee

    Belfast Celtic


    RB

    Bill McConnell

    Bohemians


    LB

    Sandy  Craig
    Greenock Morton


    RH

    Harry Hampton

    Bradford City


    CH

    Pat O'Connell (c)

    Hull City


    LH

    Mickey Hamill

    Manchester United


    OR

    Dave Rollo

    Linfield


    IR

    Sam Young

    Linfield

    CF

    Billy Gillespie

    Sheffield United

    36

    IL

    Billy Lacey

    Liverpool

    6, 80

    OL

    Frank Thompson

    Clyde


    Coach: Rab Torrans



    14.03.14

    Ireland 1 Scotland 1

    Windsor Park, Belfast

    GK

    Fred McKee

    Belfast Celtic


    RB

    Bill McConnell

    Bohemians


    LB

    Sandy  Craig
    Greenock Morton


    RH

    Val Harris

    Everton


    CH

    Pat O'Connell

    Hull City


    LH

    Mickey Hamill (c)

    Manchester United


    OR

    Johnny Houston

    Everton


    IR

    Rab Nixon

    Linfield


    CF

    Sam Young

    Linfield
    89

    IL

    Billy Lacey

    Liverpool


    OL

    Frank Thompson

    Clyde


    Coach: Hugh McAteer


    Ireland wore their St Patrick's Blue strip in all 3 matches:


    The line ups , which include players based in England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Dublin, show that the Ireland side in this era was representative of the whole of Ireland. Of the 16 players selected, 7 were from what is now Northern Ireland and 9 (including Bookman, who was born in Lithuania but grew up in Dublin) from what is now The Republic of Ireland. 

    v Scotland. The name of the cat being held by Mickey Hamill is unknown to me. He did his job though, Sam Young's late equalizer meant that Ireland were champions. 





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  • 12/14/14--01:48: The East Surrey Regiment

  • The East Surrey Regiment, Kolkata, 1890.

    It's never particularly cool in Kolkata- about 25C in December and January, so that heavyweight kit and boots must have been hard work.
    The British Military helped to spread football with their penchant for recreating English life wherever they went. 
    Football was particularly popular in Bengal , with the locals founding clubs and aspiring to be able to challenge the English.
    The first notable triumph for an Indian club  came in 1892 when Kolkata's Savabazar FC  defeated The East Surrey Regiment  in the Trades Cup final . 

    The East Surrey Regiment feature in another curious episode. On July 1st, 1916 , The first day of the Battle of The Somme, Captain Billy Nevill gave his players 2 footballs with which to lead their assault on the enemy positions. On the balls was written: The Great European Cup-Tie Final. East Surreys v Bavarians. Kick off at zero and NO REFEREE.

    Remarkably, given the carnage that followed, one of the balls was retrieved and returned to the regiments HQ.



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    Spurs at Leipzig
    When the 1911-12 season ended on April 29th Woolwich Arsenal were in 10th place in Division 1 and Tottenham Hotspur in 12th. The famous North London rivalry had yet to come into being, as Arsenal were still based in Plumstead (South East London).In May 1912 both clubs embarked on tours of central Europe (Germany, Austria-Hungary) and played each other in an exhibition match at Vienna arranged by Hugo Meisl. 



    Tottenham Hotspur

    12.05.12  
    Hull City
    2
    0
    Tottenham Hotspur
    Brussels
    The Belgian Charity Cup- Beddeker Cup
    Hull City retaining the trophy.

    16.05.12  
    VfB Leipzig
    1
    3
    Tottenham Hotspur
    Leipzig
    The hosts were Mittel-Deutschland champions and had made the semi-finals of the national championships.



    20.05.12  
    Wiener Sport Club
    2
    5
    Tottenham Hotspur
    Vienna
    24.05.12  
    Woolwich Arsenal
    4
    0
    Tottenham Hotspur
    Vienna
    An exhibition match for a solid silver cup and medals.



    27.05.12  
    Ferencváros
    1
    4
    Tottenham Hotspur
    Budapest
    Fradi were the champions of the Budapest league, winning 14 out of 18 games and having a goal difference of 57.



    28.05.12  
    Hungary
    2
    2
    Tottenham Hotspur
    Budapest
    The Hungary and Austria teams were preparing for the Olympic Tournament at Stockholm.



    30.05.12  
    Hungary
    3
    4
    Tottenham Hotspur
    Budapest
    02.06.12  
    Austria
    3
    0
    Tottenham Hotspur
    Vienna
    Both Austria and Hungary featured in the second round of that summer's Olympic tournament- Hungary had a bye in the first round and lost 7-0 to Great Britain in the second. Austria beat Germany 5-1 before losing 3-1 to the Netherlands.

    They went on to meet in the final of the consolation tournament, Hungary winning 3-0.



    Woolwich Arsenal

    11.05.12 
    Hertha BSC Berlin
    0
    5
    Woolwich Arsenal
    Berlin
    12.05.12 
    Viktoria 89 Berlin
    2
    2
    Woolwich Arsenal
    Berlin
    1911’s German National Champions.  Former Tottenham player Jack Brearley took up the coaching position at Viktoria at about this time.



    16.05.12 
    Deutscher FC Prag
    1
    4
    Woolwich Arsenal
    Prague
    19.05.12 
    Ferencváros
    1
    2
    Woolwich Arsenal
    Budapest
    22.05.12 
    Grazer AK
    0
    6
    Woolwich Arsenal
    Graz
    24.05.12 
    Woolwich Arsenal
    4
    0
    Tottenham Hotspur
    Vienna
    26.05.12 
    SK Rapid Wien
    2
    8
    Woolwich Arsenal
    Vienna
    Rapid were the Austrian League champions…



    27.05.12 
    Wiener Sport Club
    0
    5
    Woolwich Arsenal
    Vienna
    …and WSC had finished the season just one point behind Rapid.



    29.05.12 
    Sp Vgg Fürth
    0
    6
    Woolwich Arsenal
    Fürth 
    Fürth were managed by Billy Townley , the former Blackburn Rovers player.




    
    

    It was Arsenal's second visit. They had toured Belgium, Netherlands, Germany  and Austria -Hungary in 1907.  Tottenham were of course old hands at the touring lark. Having visited Austria -Hungary  in 1905 they had since played in Belgium, South America and Germany.
    
    
    
    
    
                      

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  • 12/16/14--13:05: Barcelona's Stadia


  • Velódromo de la Bonanova (1899)
    In their first ever match, (08.12.99) Barcelona played a scratch team of English expatriates (some of whom were founder members of the club) in Velódromo de la Bonanova in the Turo Parc area. For the uninitiated a velodrome is a cycling track, as you can see from the photographs above, which shows the banked track in the background. 

    Hipodrom De Can Tunis (1900-01)
    Matches were also occasionally played at this former horseracing track.





    Camp del Hotel Casanovas (1900-01)
    The estate of Hotel Casanovas was near to where Sant Pau hospital now stands. Walter Wild, the club president, negotiated the use of some of this land as a football ground.Barcelona first played there on 18.11.1900  The result was 0-0 against Athletic Club. According to contemporary reports the attendance was about 4,000.

    Campo de la Carretera de Horta (1901-1905)
    The club played its first game here on 23.11.01 against the Calliope (crew of a British ship). Barca won 4-0. Joan Gamper scored the first goal. The club had to move on when the land was developed.





    Campo de la calle Muntaner (1905-1909)
    Scene of the first ever Barcelona v (Real) Madrid (FC) clash, a 5-2 win for Barca in 1906. Later became the home of Club Deportivo Español .

    Plaza De Armas (1909)
      Occasional use only

     La Fuxarda (1909)
    The municipal stadium was used for 2 games against Sparta Prague. 




    Campo de la Calle Industria (1909-22)
    The first ground owned outright by the club had a capacity of 6,000 and featured a novel double-decker stand. It was the first ground in Spain to have floodlights. The beginnings were more modest, though- initially there were no changing rooms or running water!
    The ground was officially opened on 14.03.09, and was used until the club's success saw them outgrow the stadium in 1922. 





    Camp de Les Corts (1922 -57)
    The club therefore started the construction of a new stadium, and  Les Corts opened on  20.05.22, Barcelona playing Saint Mirren. The initial capacity was 22,000.
    In 1925, a display of Catalan nationalism on the part of the crowd at Les Corts led to the authorities closing the stadium  for 6 months (later reduced to 3).




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    The football I cultivated was a real demonstration of hardiness and energy. A game more brusque, but virile,beautiful, vigorous. The modern football is weakened by an excess of passing close to the goal. It is a game that is more fine, perhaps more artistic, even apparently more intelligent, but it has lost its primitive enthusiasm.
    It is important to keep in mind that football is not a delicate sport...it is a violent and strong game.
    Jorge Gibson BrownEl Grafico 

    The article was originally published in 1921. 
    Jorge Gibson Brown won 9 Primera División titles with Alumni and 1 with Quilmes. Between 1902-1913 he made 23 appearances for Argentina, 18 as captain. 
    Brown belonged to an era in which Argentine football modelled itself on the English game before the emergence of fútbol criollo.


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  • 11/26/14--13:36: British coaches in the Copa



  • The development of Spanish Football was always heavily influenced by Britons. As was so often the case they founded the earliest clubs and spread the enthusiasm for the Association game among the locals.
    English players (and officials) were very much in evidence in the formative years of the game in Spain. In the 1910s, when the game was more solidly established and less and less English names appeared on the teamsheets, Englishmen showed their influence in another sphere- appearing as coaches at the leading Spanish clubs.
    Looking at the teams competing in the Copa del Rey (and later the Copa del Presidente de la República) shows us the following coaches from the United Kingdom.

    1916
    Athletic Club (Bilbao) defeated Madrid FC (later Real Madrid) 4-0 in the final. Both teams were led by Englishmen.

    Barnes

    Billy Barnes was at the helm for Athletic. Born in London in 1879 Barnes played for Thames Ironworks, Sheffield United, West Ham United, Luton Town, Queen's Park Rangers and Southend United.
    He scored the winning goal for Sheffield United in the replay of the 1902 FA Cup Final.
    He managed Athletic from 1914 to 1916 and again from 1920-21.


    Johnson
    The man in charge of Madrid FC was Arthur Johnson. He was Madrid's first full time coach. Appointed in 1910, he served until 1920. He had also been a player with the club, appearing in their first ever fixture and played in 4 winning Copa del Rey teams. Johnson, who was also born in 1879, later managed Athletic Club.

    1917
    Madrid beat Arenas Club de Guecho in extra time of the replayed final, giving Arthur Johnson a Copa win as a coach to add to his 4 as a player.

    1918
    Johnson led Madrid to a third successive Copa final, but they lost 2-0 to Real Unión.


    Greenwell

    1919
    Barcelona were beaten 5-2 in the final by Arenas Club de Guecho. 
    The manager  of Barcelona was the former Crook Town wing half Jack Greenwell.  Greenwell had also played in the West Aukland team that won the Sir Thomas Lipton Trophy in 1909. 
    He joined Barcelona as a player in 1912, became coach in 1917.six Catalan titles and two Copa del Rey victories.
    As well as 2 spells at Barcelona Greenwell coached Unió Esportiva Sants, Club Deportivo Castellón,  Español, R.C.D Mallorca, Valencia, and Real Sporting de Gijón. He then moved on to Peru. 

    1920
    Greenwell and Barnes were the adversaries as Barcelona beat Athletic Club 2-0 in the final. 

    1921
    Barnes was in charge of Athletic Club , who ran out 4-0 winners against Atlético Madrid. Some sources mistakenly identify the manager of the Madrid side as former Manchester United defender Vince Hayes However, Hayes was engaged at Preston North End until 1923. 

    1922
    Another win for Greenwell- Barcelona beating Real Union 5-1.

    1923
    Athletic Club won their ninth  Copa, beating Barcelona's Club Deportivo Europe 1-0. Both sides were led by Englishmen.
    Fred Pentland won 5 England caps in 1909 (including 3 on a tour of Austria-Hungary) and played most of his  League football for Blackburn Rovers and Middlesbrough. he was interned at Ruhleben during the war, having gone to Germany to coach the national side. After the war his managerial career resumed, following a rather strange trajectory- he led France in the 1920 Olympics and retired as manager of Barrow 20 years later. in the interim he had spells coaching Racing  SantanderAthletic Club Bilbao (2 ), Atlético Madrid (3) and Real Oviedo. 

    In charge of  Club Deportivo Europe was Conyers 'Ralph' Kirby, a winger who made 1 league appearance for Birmingham. He later joined Barcelona. 


    1924
    Real Unión Club (Irun) beat Real Madrid 1-0 in the final.Real Unión Club was coached by Steve Bloomer, the legendary Derby County and England goalscorer. 
    Steve Bloomer

    1926
    Barcelona beat Atlético Madrid 3-2 in the final, which featured the same managers as 1923- Kirby leading Barcelona and Pentland Atlético.

    1932
    Spain was now a Republic, and the national cup competition was rebranded as Copa del Presidente de la República. A final between Athletic Club (who won their 12th Copa with a 1-0 win) and Barcelona saw 2 by now familiar faces in charge. Pentland (Athletic Club) and Greenwell (Barca). 








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  • 12/19/14--14:11: Freiburger FC


  • 1898
    Germany is a large country and the National Championships were organised on a regional basis, with three tiers of competition culminating in the national finals.
    The regional competitions predate the national championships. For example, the  süddeutschen (Southern Germany) championship was first decided in 1898.
    Frieburger FC were champions in 1898 and 1907. In 1907 they went onto become National Champions.



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    In 1910 football in Brazil was still an elitist sport. The top clubs in São Paulo such as Club Athletico PaulistanoSão Paulo Athletic Club  and Associação Atlética das Palmeiras were inaccessible to the proletariat.
    On August 31st 1910 the Corinthian FC played Palmeiras as part of their tour of South America, winning 2-0 with goals from / Among the spectators were a group of working men, employees of the Railway Company. They lived in the Bom Retiro neighbourhood, an area of many Italian immigrants, and their names reveal these origins: Joaquim Ambrósio,Antonio Pereira , Rafael Perrone, Anselmo Correia and Carlos Silva.
    The following day they put the plan into action and founded Sport Club Corinthians Paulista.

    Corinthians played their first match on September 10th, 1910, an away game against União da Lapa resulting in a 1–0 defeat. The team was made up of the 5 founding memebers and 6 players from another Bom Retiro team, Botafogo Athletic Association. An original club member Caetano de Domenico remembered: We met at 4 am in Bom Retiro and walked to Lapa. I helped carry the bag of shirts, nothing but  rags... At the end of the match everyone changed in a shed and came away without bathing...
    On the14th September Corinthians played a home match against  Estrela Polar, winning 2–0 (goals from  Luiz Fabbi and Jorge Campbell).  27th September saw a 5-0 win over an English club,  Associação Atlética da Lapa.

    From these rather humble beginnings Corinthians developed rapidly in terms of both ability and popularity. 
    In 1913 they joined the LPF, their first league game a 3-1 defeat away to Germania. They finished the season 4th out of 5 with one win.
    Remarkably, the following season Corinthians claimed their first Campeonato Paulista, winning the LPF with a 100% record:


    1914:Corinthians Champion de São Paulo (LPF)

    12.04.14

    Lusitano

    0

    6

    Corinthians

    10.05.14

    SC Internacional-SP

    2

    3

    Corinthians

    17.05.14

    Minas Gerais

    1

    2

    Corinthians

    21.06.14

    Corinthians

    3

    1

    Germânia*

    14.07.14

    Corinthians

    5

    1

    Campos Elyseos

    26.07.14

    Corinthians

    4

    1

    Hydecroft*

    13.09.14

    Corinthians

    4

    2

    SC Internacional-SP

    27.09.14

    Corinthians
    3

    1

    Minas Gerais
    08.11.14

    Corinthians
    4

    0

    Campos Elyseos
    15.11.14

    Corinthians
    3

    0

    Lusitano


    * Germania and Hydecroft left the league and the results of their matches were annulled. 

    P
    W
    D
    L
    F
    A
    8
    8
    0
    0
    30
    7


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  • 12/21/14--12:37: G.O Smith
  • G.O Smith transformed the role of the centre-forward from that of an individual striker into a unifier of the forward line, indeed the whole team.
     The Dictionary of National Biography
    He was a maker rather than a scorer of goals.
    The Times 

    G.O Smith was widely held to be the greatest centre forward of his age and the greatest player of the 19th century.
    Smith was an amateur who played for Oxford University , Old Carthusians and Corinthians. 
    He made a total of 20 appearances for England (scoring 11 goals), between 1893 and 1901.

    Match







    Goal

    1

    25.02.93

    England

    6

    1

    Ireland

    Perry Bar

    1

    Smith, playing as inside right, scored England’s 4th goal on 43 minutes. 20 years, 92 days on debut.


    2

    12.03.94

    Wales

    1

    5

    England

    Racecourse


    Smith was at centre forward.


    3

    07.04.94

    Scotland

    2

    2

    England

    Celtic Park


    John Goodall was at centre forward, Smith reverting to inside right.


    4

    05.03.95

    England

    1

    1

    Wales

    Queen's Club


    Smith was at centre forward. He played the rest of his internationals in this position. 


    5

    07.03.96

    Ireland

    0

    2

    England

    Solitude, Belfast

    2

    Smith scored England’s first on 40 minutes, there were 3 years between his 1st and 2nd international goals.


    6

    16.03.96

    Wales

    1

    9

    England *

    Cardiff Arms Park

    4

    Smith’s first game as captain saw him score England’s 1st (15 min) and 5th (44 min).


    7

    04.04.96

    Scotland

    2

    1

    England*

    Celtic Park



    8

    20.02.97

    England*

    6

    0

    Ireland

    Trent Bridge, Nottingham



    9

    29.03.97

    England*

    4

    0

    Wales

    Bramall Lane, Sheffield



    10

    03.04.97

    England*

    1

    2

    Scotland

    Crystal Palace










    11

    05.03.98

    Ireland

    2

    3

    England*

    Solitude, Belfast

    5

    Almost 2 years since his previous international goal Smith equalised with England’s opening goal on 37 minutes.


    12

    28.03.98

    Wales

    0

    3

    England*

    Racecourse

    6

    Smith opened the scoring in the 9th minute.


    13

    02.04.98

    Scotland

    1

    2

    England

    Celtic Park


    Charles Wreford-Brown replaced Smith as captain.


    14

    18.02.99

    England *

    13

    2

    Ireland

    Roker Park, Sunderland

    10

    Smith put England 4-0 ahead in the 32nd minute and added 3 rapid goals (59, 60 and 63) at which point England led 11-0.


    15

    20.03.99

    England*

    4

    0

    Wales

    Ashton Gate, Bristol



    16

    08.04.99

    England*

    2

    1

    Scotland

    Villa Park

    11

    Smith opened the scoring on 25 minutes, his  1st goal against Scotland in 5 starts.



    17

    17.03.00

    Ireland

    0

    2

    England*

    Lansdowne Road, Dublin



    18

    26.03.00

    Wales

    1

    1

    England *

    Cardiff Arms Park



    19

    07.04.00

    Scotland

    4

    1

    England*

    Celtic Park



    20

    30.03.01

    England*

    2

    2

    Scotland

    Crystal Palace




    * denotes that Smith was captain. His record as captain was:


    P

    W

    D

    L

    14

    9

    2

    3

      A 64% win rate.


     The British Home Championships in seasons when Smith was captain:


    season

    P

    W

    D

    L

    F

    A

    Pos.

    1895-96*

    3

    2

    0

    1

    12

    3

    2

    1896-97

    3

    2

    0

    1

    11

    2

    2

    1897-98*

    3

    3

    0

    0

    9

    3

    1

    1898-99

    3

    3

    0

    0

    19

    3

    1

    1899-00

    3

    1

    1

    1

    4

    5

    3


    *captain in 2 games.

    0 0
  • 12/22/14--12:47: The American Cup

  • Association Football in the United States developed in industrialised areas in the East. The blue collar sector of East Coast society included a significant percentage of European workers.The influence of the textile industry in New Jersey was particularly important, as were the connections that a number of the leading manufacturers (Clark Thread Company of Paisley, Michael Nairn & Company of Kirkcaldy) had with Scotland. Paterson was noted for silk production, which also attracted a great deal of experienced Scottish labour.

    As we have seen in previous posts one of the biggest problems that American soccer has faced during its history has been the power struggles between rival governing bodies and  associations. The American Football Association, founded in 1884, was the United States' first Association Football Governing body, and it was under the auspices of this Association that the first 'cross league' competition was played.
    The tournament is usually referred to simply as The American Cup. Here is a list of the finals, up until the 8 year hiatus that saw the tournament lose it's prestige.


    1885

    Clark O.N.T.
    1

    0

    New York

    1886

    Clark O.N.T.
    3

    1

    Kearny Rangers

    1887

    Clark O.N.T.
    3

    2

    Kearny Rangers

    1888

    Fall River Rovers

    5

    1

    Newark Almas

    1889

    Fall River Rovers

    4

    0

    Newark Caledonian

    1890

    Fall River Olympics

    4

    3

    Kearny Rovers

    1891

    Fall River East Ends

    3

    1

    Brooklyn Longfellows

    1892

    Fall River East Ends

    5

    2

    New York Thistle

    1893

    Pawtucket Free Wanderers

    3

    1

    New York Thistle

    1894

    Pawtucket Olympics

    4

    1

    Paterson True Blues

    1895

    Newark Caledonian

    4

    0

    Pawtucket Free Wanderers

    1896

    Paterson True Blues

    7

    2

    Fall River Olympics

    1897

    Philadelphia Mainz

    5

    2

    Paterson True Blues


    Replay following a 2-2 draw.

    1898

    Kearny Arlington

    4

    2

    Paterson True Blues




    The first edition attracted 6 entrants (some sources state 13 but this appears to confuse the event with later editions).

    The entrants were:
    Caledonian Thistle Club (Paterson)- whose name leaves no doubt about their Scottish origins.
    Clark O.N.T. (Kearney) -sponsored by the Clark Thread Company ONT was short for Our New Thread, Clark’s latest product.
    Domestic (Newark)- backed by a well known sewing machine manufacturer.
    Kearny Rangers
    New York F.B.C.
    Paterson F.B.C.


    First Round
    25.10.84
    Clark O.N.T.

    2

    0

    Domestic

    ONT AA Grounds Kearney

    01.11.84
    Kearny Rangers

    3

    2

    Caledonian Thistle

    Domestic Baseball Grounds

    Newark

    01.11.84
    New York

    5

    0

    Paterson

    Hoboken


    Semi Final
    A draw was made that gave Clark O.N.T a bye into the final.

    27.11.84
    Kearny Rangers

    0

    4

    New York

    Domestic Baseball Grounds

    Newark


    FINAL
    14.02.85
    Clark O.N.T.

    2

    1

    New York

    Emmet Street Grounds Newark

    The match was played in snow. New York protested that not all the ONT players were genuine members of the club and that the goal posts were not regulation size. The AFA ordered a replay.


    25.04.85
    Clark O.N.T.

    1

    0

    New York

    Olympic Grounds Paterson



    
    
    
    
    As well as a handsome trophy the winners received prize money of $150.

    0 0

    Yorkshire Evening Post 19.01.31

    James Jackson Jnr.
    Son of  the former Woolwich Arsenal skipper James Jackson Senior, James Jackson Jnr. was an extraordinary man. Cousin of Australian test cricketer Archie Jackson, he began his career in Scotland, playing for Queen's Park, Motherwell and Aberdeen before moving to Liverpool.  Jackson represented both the Scottish League and the Football League in inter league fixtures.
    On retiring from football he was ordained as a minister of religion having studied at Cambridge University whilst still playing for Liverpool.




    Kenny Campbell
    By the time this service was held Campbell was coming to the end of his football career, and was in his second spell with New Brighton. The heartthrob of Anfield , he had joined Liverpool from Cambuslang Rangers in 1911 and spent 9 seasons with the Reds, during which he was capped 8 times by Scotland. As well as New Brighton he later played for Partick Thistle, Stoke  and Leicester City.





    0 0
  • 12/24/14--14:16: Fosse
  • 1886
    The Roman settlement of Ratae Corieltauvorum stood on the route of Fosse Way, a road connecting Exeter with Lincoln , crossing England diagonally. The word Fosse derives from the Latin Fossa = ditch , which suggests that the road followed the line of defensive earthworks that at one time marked the western extent of the Roman settlements in Britain. 
    Fast forward to 1884, Ratae Corieltauvorum has evolved to Leicester. When a football club is formed they play their matches on a field near the Fosse Way and adopt the name Leicester Fosse. 
    Fosse first entered the FA Cup in 1890.
    In 1891 they joined the Midland League and in 1894 were elected to the Football League. 




    0 0

    From the first international in 1872 to the end of the 1899-1900 season Scotland played
    71 internationals . They won 73% of these games.
    43 different players led Scotland during this time, the majority for just a single game.

    The captains were drawn from the following clubs:

    Queen’s Park
    19*
    Glasgow Rangers
    7*
    Celtic
    5
    Dumbarton
    4
    Vale of Leven
    2
    Airdrieonians
    1
    Aston Villa
    Cambuslang
    Dundee
    Heart of Midlothian
    St Bernards
    Third Lanarkshire Rifle Volunteers
    * George Gillespie played for both

    1. Robert Gardner (Queen's Park)
    Poacher turned gamekeeper (forward turned goalkeeper) played an active role in arranging the first international match. He kept clean sheets in club matches for the best part of 2 years and reputedly sometimes smoked a pipe during play. He was captain in the 1872 and 1873 matches against England:

    P
    W
    D
    L
    2
    0
    1
    1




    1- Thompson, 2-Taylor, 3 - Campbell 


    2. James Thompson (Queen's Park)
    Such was Queen's Parks pre eminence in the Scottish game that when Gardner left to join Clydesdale it was felt appropriate to pass the captaincy on to another Queen's Park player. Half back James Thompson led Scotland to a 2-1 victory over England at West of Scotland Cricket Ground on 07.03.74 , his only game as captain. 

    3. Joseph Taylor (Queen's Park)
    Full back Taylor captained Scotland against England in 1875 and Wales in 1876. He later became President of Queen's Park.

    P

    W

    D

    L

    %
    2

    1

    1

    0

    50

    4. Charles Campbell (Queen's Park)
    Campbell was one of the few players to enjoy a protracted international career in the early decades. He played in 13 matches over 12 seasons and captained Scotland 8 times between 1876 and 1885.

    P

    W

    D

    L

    %

    8

    6

    1

    1

    75



    5. Robert Neill (Queen's Park)
    The full back was captain against Wales in 1878 and England in 1880.

    P
    W
    D
    L
    %
    2
    2
    0
    0
    100

    MacDougall


    6.John McDougall (Vale of Leven)
    In international #12 McDougall became the first non Queen's Park player to lead Scotland ( a 3-0 win over Wales). The previous year McDougall was the first Scotsman to score 3 goals in an International match. 

























    5 Scotland captains in this Queen's Park line up from 1880-81. 1-Campbell, 2 -Davidson, 3-Watson, 4-Rowan, 5-Holm.

    7. David Davidson (Queen's Park)
    The half back was captain in a 5-0 win over Wales in 1880.

    8. Andrew Watson (Queen's Park)
    The World's first black international footballer was also the World's first black international captain. His 2 matches as captain were a resounding success,  a 6-1 win over England and a 5-1 win against Wales.

    P
    W
    D
    L
    %
    2
    2
    0
    0
    100

    9. Archibald Rowan (Queen's Park)
    The goalkeeper led Scotland to a 5-0 win over Wales in 1882.

    10. Andrew Holm (Queen's Park)
    1883's matches against England and Wales were won under the captaincy of the Queen's Park full back.

    P
    W
    D
    L
    %
    2
    2
    0
    0
    100


    11. Walter Arnott (Queen's Park)
    Right back Arnott won 14 caps over a 10 year period and captained his country on 3 occasions (1884-91).

    P

    W

    D

    L

    %

    3

    1

    1

    1

    33.3


    12.Michael Paton (Dumbarton)
    The Sons' defender led Scotland to wins over Wales in 1884 and 1885 .


    P
    W
    D
    L
    %
    2
    2
    0
    0
    100


    McPherson

    13. John McPherson (Vale of Leven)
    An 8-2 win over Ireland was the centre half's sole game as captain. 

    14. John Lambie (Queen's Park)
    The youngest ever Scotland player, captain and goalscorer. The 17 year old captained his country in a 7-2 win over Ireland in 1886, scoring on his international debut. 


    P
    W
    D
    L
    %
    2
    2
    0
    0
    100

    15. William Semple (Cambuslang)
    In his one and only international appearance Semple led Scotland to a 4-1 win over Wales in 1886.

    16.James McAulay (Dumbarton)
    Goalkeeper captain in his final 2 internationals (1887), McAulay had earlier been capped as a forward.

    P
    W
    D
    L
    %
    2
    2
    0
    0
    100

    17. Robert Smellie (Queen's Park)
    Another 100% record, wins against Wales in 1888 and England in 1889. 

    P
    W
    D
    L
    %
    2
    2
    0
    0
    100

    18. Donald Gow (Glasgow Rangers) 
    The 20 year old Rangers full back led his country in his only international- a 5 -0 home defeat at the hands of England. He was the first Rangers player to captain Scotland. 

    19. Duncan Stewart (Dumbarton)
    Stewart's only international- a 10-2 win over Ireland in 1888.

    20. Thomas Robertson (Queen's Park)
    Robertson was captain in 3 matches (1889-92)

    P
    W
    D
    L
    %
    3
    3
    0
    0
    100

    21. Andrew Thompson (3rd Lanarkshire Rifle Volunteers)
    One of 6 Thirds players in the team that was held to a 0-0 draw by Wales in 1889.

    22. George Gillespie (Glasgow Rangers/Queen's Park)
    The goalkeeper had featured in 5 previous internationals spread over a 10 year period before he was chosen as captain to face Wales in 1890. He returned to Queen's Park and captained Scotland once more the following season.

    P
    W
    D
    L
    %
    2
    2
    0
    0
    100

    23. John McLeod (Dumbarton)
    Another goalkeeper captain- he led Scotland to a 4-1 win over Ireland in his only game as captain (1890).

    McLaren
    24. Jimmy McLaren (Celtic)
    The first Celtic player to lead Scotland, in a 1-1 draw with England in 1890. 

    25. John Hill (Heart of Midlothian)
    The first Edinburgh based player to lead Scotland, half-back Hill was captain in a 6-1 win over Wales at Tynecastle in 1892. 

    26. William Sellar (Queen's Park)
    The centre half was captain when England beat Scotland 4-1 at Ibrox in 1892.

    27. Donald Sillars (Queen's Park)
    Scotland put 8 unanswered past Wales in Wrexham in Sillars' first match as captain in 1893. 2 years later a 2-2 draw was the result. 

    P
    W
    D
    L
    %
    2
    1
    1
    0
    50

    Kelly
    28. James Kelly (Celtic)
     Celtic's first ever captain led Scotland on 4 occasions between 1893-96.

    P
    W
    D
    L
    %
    4
    2
    1
    1
    50

    29. Robert Marshall (Glasgow Rangers) 
    Captain in a 2-1 win at Belfast in 1894.

    30. Daniel 'Ned' Doyle (Celtic) 
    A 2-2 draw with England at Celtic Park , 1894. 



    31. Jock Drummond (Glasgow Rangers) 
    The full- back led Scotland for the first time in 1895 and played into the 20th century. In the 19th century he captained Scotland 3 times. According to historian Douglas Lamming, Drummond was the last Scottish outfielder to play in a cap!

    P
    W
    D
    L
    %
    3
    3
    0
    0
    100

    32.Jimmy Oswald (St Bernard's)
    Goodison Park, 1895, England 3, Scotland 0. 

    33. John Gillespie (Queen's Park)

    Captain in His only international as Wales were beaten 4-0 at Carolina Port.

    34. John Ritchie (Queen's Park)
    Another one cap captain, in a 2-2 draw with Wales at Wrexham. 

    35. William Lambie (Queen's Park)
    The second Lambie brother to captain Scotland. William Lambie was capped 9 times and scored in each of his first 4 appearances. In 1897 he was captain as England were beaten 2-1 at Crystal Palace. It was his final international, at the age of 24.

    36. Matthew Scott (Airdrieonians)
    The full back was captain in his only international appearance- a 5-2 win over Wales at Fir Park.

    37. Robert Kelso (Dundee)
    Kelso had made his debut for Scotland 13 years earlier whilst playing for Renton. Now in his final (7th) appearance he captained his country to a 3-0 win over Ireland at Solitude.

    Cowan
    38. Jimmy Cowan (Aston Villa)
    The first player to lead Scotland whilst at an English club the 29 year old centre half was captain in a 3-1 loss against England at Celtic Park. It was his 3rd and final international.

    39. Nicol Smith (Glasgow Rangers)
    Nicol Smith was a very highly regarded defender who died at the early age of 31. In 1899 he was captain for the 6-0 win over Wales and the 2-0 defeat against England.

    P

    W

    D

    L

    %
    2

    1

    0

    1

    50

    Storrier 
    40. David Storrier (Celtic)
    In between Smith's 2 matches a captain Celtic's David Storrier led the Scots to an emphatic 9-1 win over Ireland.

    41. Bob Hamilton (Glasgow Rangers)
    Scotland selected 3 different captains in 1900. Hamilton led at Pittodrie for a 5-2 win against Wales.

    42.Harry Marshall (Celtic)
    Captain in a 3-0 win at Solitude against Ireland.

    Robertson
    43. Jacky Robertson (Glasgow Rangers)
    John Tait Robertson went onto become Chelsea's player manager and their first ever signing. He was captain in a 4-1 win over England at Celtic Park. 



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  • 12/27/14--10:56: Robert Cunliffe Gosling




  • The best-looking man of my acquaintance - C.B Fry 
    The most aristocratic-looking man I ever saw J.A.H Catton
    The richest man who ever played football for England Sir Frederick Wall

    Cunliffe Gosling was an inside forward who  played in 5 matches for England (1892-97) and never finished on the losing side. He represented Cambridge University, Old Etonians and Corinthian FC. 
    Gosling confirmed the archetype that in Victorian England  those from a privileged background were more robustly built- he was 1.87m and 83 kg.
    Sir Frederick Wall's statement was based on the fact that Gosling came from a wealthy landed family, and that when he died in 1922 his estate was worth the equivalent of £21.2 million in today's money. 

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