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  • 04/24/15--10:52: Zestafoni


  •  These youthful looking players represented Zestafoni FC in 1923. Zestafoni is a city in western Georgia, which at the time was a part of the Soviet Union (from 1921 onwards). 
    Between 1918 and 1921 Georgia was a Democratic Republic.
    In 1918 the first club in Zestafoni was formed by high school students.
    In 1920, during the period of The Allied Intervention (an unsuccessfulwestern scheme to undermine the  Revolution) Zestafoni played against a British Military team and won 2-1.
      In 1927 Zestafoni competed in the first republic-wide championship of Georgia.



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  • 04/26/15--10:05: 1873
  •  We have previously alluded to the position of the Queen's Park club as a de facto governing body within Scottish football.
    It comes as no surprise, then, to find that when steps were taken to actually form a Scottish Football Association that Queen's Park were the originators of the scheme. 
    It all began with a proposal for a knock out competition along the lines of the FA Cup. On February 8th 1873 the committee of Queen's Park instructed the secretary, Archibald Rae to write to all Scottish clubs proposing a cup competition.
    The resulting meeting on 13th March, 1873, was attended by representatives of  the following clubs (along, of course, with Queen's Park themselves):

     Clydesdale
    Founded 1872, dissolved 1881, based in Kinning Park in south Glasgow (later home to Rangers).

    Vale of Leven
    Founded 1872, dissolved 1929, from Alexandria in West Dunbartonshire (to the west of Glasgow).In 1876 they became the first club to defeat Queen's Park ever! One of the first teams to seriously challenge the dominance of Queen's Park. Won the cup in 1877, 1878 and 1879.

    Rovers FC
    1873-78. Played at The Queen's Park , a public park in which Queen's Park had originally played. Rovers expressed an interest in the venture, but are not listed as founding members of the SFA.

    Dumbreck
    1871-79, based at Glasgow's Ibroxhill.

    3rd Lanarkshire Rifle Volunteers
    Founded in 1872, the Cathkin Park club survived until 1967. Their military connections were by then a distant memory. Cup winners in 1889 and 1905.

    Eastern
    Active from 1873-85 Eastern were another 'public park' team based in Glasgow.

    Granville 
    1872-78. This was Granville's only entry into The Scottish Cup. 3 of the players in Scotland's first international XI were members of the club (as well as being members of Queen's Park).


    The resolution passed on March 13th was:

    The clubs here represented form themselves into an association for the promotion of football according to the rules of The Football Association and that the clubs connected with this association subscribe for a challenge cup to be played for annually, the committee to propose the laws of the competition.
    The first elected officials were: 
    President: Archibald Campbell (Clydesdale) 
    Hon. treasurer: Mr. William Ker (Queen's Park)
    Hon.secretary: Archibald Rae (Queen's Park) 
    Committee:James Turnbull (Dumbreck), Don. McFarlane (Vale of Leven), Eben Hendry (Clydesdale), W. E. Dick (Third Lanark), John Mackay (Granville), James McIntyre (Eastern), Robert Gardner (Queen's Park), and William Gibb (Clydesdale).
     A special mention is due to :
    Kilmarnock
    One of the oldest clubs in Scotland, founded in 1869, Kilmarnock were technically not founder members. They did, however, send a letter to the meeting giving their support to the proposals . They had to wait a while for their cup successes, which came in 19201929, and 1997.

    These 9 clubs were joined by the following 7 for the first round of the the first edition of the Scottish FA Cup in October 1873.

    Alexandra  Athletic

    1873-84- based in the East End of Glasgow.

    Callander

    1872-74- a short lived Glasgow club who were Rangers' first ever opponents.

    Dumbarton

    1872- present. Currently in the second tier of Scottish football. Appeared in 6 Cup Finals in the 19th century , winning in 1883.

    Renton

    1872-1922.  The Dunbartonshire club were one of the big names in 19th century game.  Played in 5 Cup Finals in the 19th Century, winning in 1885 and 1888. They were World Champions in 1888.

    Blythswood

    1872-79. From Kelvinside in Glasgow.

    Southern

    1872-75. Scratched from their only ever Scottish FA Cup match.

    Western

    1873-78. Another Glasgow suburban team.




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    MAJOR MARINDIN ON THE ASSOCIATION GAME

    A reporter has had an interview with Major Marindin, the president of the football association, who said at first he was opposed to the introduction of professionals, but he admits the result has been most satisfactory, for bona fide professionals it has been found do not play by any means so rough a game as do many so called amateurs. Many of them earn as much as £2 a week all the year round and their brilliant playing has certainly  done not a little for the game as a whole.  “The great curse of Association football at the present moment is the rough game adopted by a large number of clubs. We are determined to put this down.  Our rules are strong enough, but our difficulty is to get umpires with sufficient moral courage to stop rough play.  In any case I may remark that the Association is not so dangerous a game as Rugby. We get fractures and broken limbs, but we don’t get injuries to the neck and back that prove so fatal to the Rugby players.  As to betting at football, it is undoubtedly a great evil. It hardly exists in the South to such an extent as one finds it in the North.  There books are made on every great match, and a large amount of money without question changes hands.” “Is it for this reason” the Reporter asked “that such huge gates follow on great football matches?” “Hardly” replied the Major. “Football is rapidly becoming such a popular game that it is drawing even larger crowds than cricket. At the same time, I don’t think our clubs are making as much money as the public think.  You see they have to keep 11 or 15 players in service all the year round, and the travelling expenses of these are very large.  
    Lancashire Evening Post, 20.11.88





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  • 04/28/15--13:52: Amsterdam 1928

  • The Olympic Final, 1928. I believe that it's Fernando Paternoster out jumping Jose Nasazzi.  Jose Andrade looks on.



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  • 04/29/15--12:27: Wisła Kraków








  • 1907
    Wisła Kraków was founded in May 1906 by students of the Second Practical School in Kraków
    In 1925 they made the first appearance in the Polish championship, which that season was formed of 3 leagues of 3 teams followed by a round-robin final. Wisła  reached the final stage but finished bottom of the table. 
    In 1927 the Championship took on a more familiar form. 14 teams took part and Wisła emerged as champions (scoring an average of 3.6 goals per game in the process). They repeated the feat the following season. 

    Polish artist Wlastimil Hofman painted the 1927 team:


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  • 05/01/15--12:53: Edinburgh
  • Edinburgh occupies a significant place in the pre-history of football, The Foot-Ball Club being active from 1824-1841. In the Association era, however, it was the west of Scotland that set the pace- the oldest clubs being Queen's Park (1867) and Kilmarnock (1869). The 8 clubs who formed the Scottish Football Association and the further 8 who joined them in the inaugural Scottish Cup (1873–74) were all from the west.
    In order to spread the popularity of the game The Scottish FA arranged an exhibition match at Edinburgh. The game was played at Edinburgh Royal High School FP football ground (a Rugby ground) on  December 27th 1873. 



    Morning Post - 20.12.73

    Among those who witnessed this exhibition, the first time Association (the Queen's Park variant) had been played in the capital, were members of the Heart of Midlothian club. Originally a dancing club, the members had been playing a form of football in 1873 but now decided to adopt the Association rules. In 1875 the club became members of the Scottish Football Association and were founder members of the Edinburgh Football Association.



    Tom Purdie, founder member and first captain.



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    In football the  Rioplatense rivalry, whether in internationals between Argentina and Uruguay or in club fixtures, is one of the oldest and most intense. 
    The first known meeting between Uruguayan and Argentinian footballers was actually contested by 22 Britons. 
    English (and Scottish) influence in the game on both sides of the River Plate persisted well into the 20th century. In the 1880s football in both states was an almost exclusively British affair. The game in question was billed as Buenos Aires vs. Montevideo. It took place on August 15th 1889 at Montevideo's La Blanqueada.
    The Uruguayan team was organized by the Montevideo Cricket Club, and consisted of members of that club along with players from Montevideo Rowing Club.  Buenos Aires' players came exclusively from Buenos Aires F.C. 

    Montevideo XI
    Buenos Aires XI
    Donovan
    G
    Carmichael
    H.C. Alexander
    FB
    Crowe
    C. Jefferies
    FB
    Paton
    R. Marshbank
    HB
    M. MacAdam
    C.E. Jewell
    HB
    Moser
    A. Davie
    HB
    Phillips
    Scoones
    F
    Guy
    F.B. Faran
    F
    Morgan
    W. L Poole
    F
    Hughes
    R. Harris
    F
    Alexander
    R.Penfold
    F
    Tudor
    
    
    
    
    
    
    Alexander and Guy put Buenos Aires 2-0 up by half time. Scoones pulled one back for Montevideo before Hughes completed the visitors' 3-1 win.


    
    
    
                      

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  • 05/04/15--13:41: Bert Freeman



  • Bertram Clewley Freeman played a total of 321 league games, scoring 198 goals. He won 5 England caps between 1909 and 1912, scoring 3 goals. He scored the only goal of the 1914 FA Cup Final when Burnley beat Liverpool.
    He began his professional carer with Aston Villa, but transferred to Woolwich Arsenal without ever having made a first team appearance. 
    In 1908 Freeman was released by Woolwich Arsenal and joined Everton. This proved to be a shrewd bit of business on Everton's part, as in the 1908-09 season Freeman became the League's top scorer, with 38 goals in 37 games.  
    Freeman scored 61 goals in 86 games for Everton (including 6 hat tricks). 
    In 1910 he moved to Burnley, and was the  top goalscorer in the Second Division in both 1911-12 (32 goals) and 1912-13 (31 goals).


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    Bell’s Life in London and Sporting Chronicle 05.12.63

    The above is a letter from W. Chesterman, the Hon, Sec. of Sheffield Football Club which was read to the meeting of the Football Association held on December 1st 1863.  Mr Chesterman makes observations and suggestions. The Sheffield Rules had been in operation since 1857, and, as was to be the case with the Association Laws of the Game, were evolving on a year by year basis.
    By 1877 the Sheffield and Association rules had converged completely.



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  • 05/07/15--13:20: St Luke's, Blakenhall

  • John Baynton and John Brodie were pupils of St Luke's school in Blakenhall when the headmaster, Harry Barcroft, presented the lads with a football. They were inspired to form a club.
     The proposed Goldthorn Football Club actually chose the name St Luke's. 
    They played their first matches in 1877.
    In 1879 St Luke's merged with football enthusiasts from a local cricket club, The Wanderers, and adopted the name Wolverhampton Wanderers. 


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    The earliest games in our list of influential matches predate the establishment of the Association.
    Before 1863 there was no Association football, and throughout the 1860s the game was fluid in nature as experimental rules came and went, Spectators (and there were few) witnessed a change from an 'everyone behind the ball' game in which catches and handling played a significant role, as did touchdowns for a while, into something more akin to modern soccer, Having said that by 1870 Association football was still far from being the finished article. There were still no corner kicks or crossbars, ends were changed after every score, and the goalkeeper was not a recognised position


    Football at Harrow - played with a pudding shaped ball...
    Harrow- 1850s
    The Football Association's  Laws of the Game were developed in order to unify existing codes that were in use in various schools and colleges. The Harrow rules were one such code. Given the later importance of Charles Alcock in the development and promotion of the Association game, we must acknowledge the importance of Alcock's earliest footballing experiences.  Alcock attended Harrow from 1855 to 1859 ; he was in Drury's House. The Houses played each other for the honour of being 'Cock House'. It was the format of these knockout competitions that inspired the FA Cup.
    The press (in particular Bell’s Life in London and Sporting Chronicle) carried reports on football matches played at all the leading public schools. I have only been able to find one contemporary press report of Alcock playing football at Harrow- Bell’s Life in London and Sporting Chronicle (12.12.58) has an account of a match between Rev. B.H Drury's and Rev. Dr. Vaughan's (the Houses took the names of the leading masters). Drury's won by 1 base to 0 (base was the Harrovian term for a goal)- the base was obtained by 'a capital kick by Mr Alcock'. The result confirmed Drury's as Cock House for the season.

    Sheffield FC v 58th (Rutlandshire) Regiment of Foot- 1858

    It is impossible to overlook the importance of Sheffield's contribution to the development of the Association game. The Sheffield Rules predated the Football Association by 6 years, and were adopted by many clubs and associations in the midlands. Sheffield was a frequent source of inspiration as the Laws of the Game evolved during the 1860s and 70s. During the early years of its exsitence the Sheffield club played scratch matches between its members. 
    Sheffiled versus Hallam in 1860 is often referred to as the earliest club football match, however, there are references to Sheffield FC playing a team from the 58th (Rutlandshire) Regiment of Foot in 1858. Unfortunately I have not been able to find any accounts of this match.

    Barnes v Richmond 1863
    The Presidents side v The Secretary's side, played at Battersea Park on 9th January 1864 was scheduled to be the first encounter under the newly drafted Football Association Laws of the Game.  However, EC Morley et al were keen to get on with it, and on December 19th 1863 the very first game of football played under Football Association rules took place at Limes Field, Mortlake, between Barnes FC and Richmond FC.
     The 15 a side game, ' distinguished by no disputes about the rules', ended in a 0-0 draw.


    The Association game continued to be played on an informal basis throughout the decade, mainly by clubs in the metropolitan area. Sheffield football also flourished, and both sets of rules underwent gradual changes and slowly a spectacle bearing a closer resemblance to modern football emerged, as handling, fair catches and touchdowns were eradicated. 


    London v Sheffield 1866 
    The first representative match under the auspices of the FA.  Sheffield FC had initially asked the FA for a match with one of the FA member clubs. The FA however selected a Football Association XI, drawn from 4 metropolitan clubs- Wanderers, Barnes, NN's and Civil Service. 
    The Youdan Cup 1867
    February 16th 1867 saw first round of the first ever knockout football tournament. It was played under Sheffield Rules during a period where the 4 yard goal and the rouge were in use (thus distancing it somewhat from modern soccer). The eventual winners, Hallam, defeated Heeley 2-0 (and 2 rouges to 1) in their first round match. 

    Middlesex v Kent-1867

    Another venture masterminded by CW Alcock to stimulate interest in the Association game was an attempt to introduce inter county matches.
    The first of this sporadic series was due to take place on November 2nd at Beaufort House, but Lord Ranelagh, being in dispute with the Amatuer Athletic Club, in whose name the ground was leased, withdrew his permission for his land to be used, and the game was played 'in the wilds' of Battersea Park. The match ended in a 0-0 draw.
    The ground was described as being 'in wretched order' but the match itself ('a most stubbornly contested game') was given a good write up.
    In these days in which the FA were working hard to spread the appeal of the game it is worth remembering when reading enthusiastic and glowing reports of 0-0 draws played in unfavourable conditions that the author might well have been none other than C.W Alcock! 


    Queen's Park v Thistle- 1868

    I'm not going to turn these posts into a catalogue of the first games of all significant clubs, but i'll make an exception in the case of Queen's Park. Queen's Park assumed the status of an institution within the Scottish game in its earliest days, and fulfilled the functions of a national association. As with Sheffield (above) the earliest games were between scratch sides drawn from club members. 
    On 1st August 1868 Queen's Park had their first fixture against outside opposition: Played at the Recreation Ground (South Side Park?) fellow Glaswegians,Thistle FC were beaten by  'two goals within an hour'.
    Having kept a clean sheet in their debut match Queen's Park didn't concede a goal until March 1875 and their unbeaten run went on until 1876.

    Wanderers v West Kent 1869

     In the 1860s London's football was played in public parks such as Clapham Common and Battersea Park. There were no enclosed football grounds. 
    On Saturday October 9th 1869 The Wanderers v West Kent was played at the Kennington Oval, the home of Surrey Cricket Club. This arose from CW Alcock's involvement with Surrey Cricket Club.
    As well as generating (negligible) income for the cricket club in the winter months, it meant that the Football Association now had access to a large enclosed venue capable of accommodating thousands of paying spectators. During the course of the following decade The Oval became a regular venue for club fixtures and hosted big events such as FA Cup Finals and semi finals, internationals, and The Varsity match.


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  • 05/09/15--11:50: Colo-Colo Tour, 1927

  • Club Social y Deportivo Colo-Colo only came into being in 1925 when David Arellano and others defected from the Magallanes club. In only their second year of existence Colo-Colo undertook a tour of Central America, Iberia and South America. 

    The party, led by President of the Chilean Football Federation, Carlos Cariola and  Secretary Alberto Parodi, included the following players:


    Manuel ‘Maestro’ Guerrero*
    GK
    Roberto Cortés*
    GK
    Ulises Poirier*
    D
    Ernesto Chaparro*
    D
    Jorge Linford*
    D
    José Rosetti*
    D
    Francisco ‘Mono’ Arellano*
    D
    Togo Bascuñán
    D
    Manuel Figueroa*
    D
    Víctor Morales*
    HB
    Waldo ‘El Indio’ Sanhueza
    HB
    Oscar ‘Colo-Colo’ González
    HB
    Guillermo Saavedra*
    CH
    Carlos Schneeberger*
    F
    Guillermo Subiabre*
    F
    Horacio Muñoz*
    F
    David Arellano*
    F
    José Miguel Olguín*
    F
    Humberto Moreno*
    F

    * denotes Chilean international.


     






    Ecuador


    14.01.27

    Norte América

    0

    7

     Colo-Colo

    Guayaquil

    15.01.27

    Córdova / Racing

    0

    7

     Colo-Colo

    Guayaquil


    Cuba

    28.01.27

    Iberia - Juventud Asturiana

    1

    4

     Colo-Colo

    Havana

    30.01.27

    Sport Fortuna

    3

    2

     Colo-Colo

    Havana


    Mexico

    12.02.27

    Necaxa

    0

    3

     Colo-Colo

    Mexico City

    13.02.27

    Real España

    1

    0

     Colo-Colo

    Mexico City

    20.02.27

    América

    1

    6

     Colo-Colo

    Mexico City

    22.02.27

    Club México

    1

    3

     Colo-Colo

    Mexico City

    25.02.27

    Atlante

    0

    4

     Colo-Colo

    Mexico City

    27.02.27

    Asturias

    1

    1

     Colo-Colo

    Mexico City

    01.03.27

    Selección de Guadalajara

    1

    4

     Colo-Colo

    Guadalajara

    03.03.27

    Selección de Guadalajara

    0

    4

     Colo-Colo

    Guadalajara

    08.03.27

    Club México - Necaxa

    1

    3

     Colo-Colo

    Mexico City

    11.03.27

    Ejército y Armada

    2

    3

     Colo-Colo

    Mexico City

    12.03.27

    Albinegros de Orizaba

    0

    5

     Colo-Colo

    Orizaba

    13.03.27

    Albinegros de Orizaba

    0

    8

     Colo-Colo

    Orizaba


    Spain

    03.04.27

    Pontevedra

    3

    4

     Colo-Colo

    La Coruña

    07.04.27

    Deportivo de La Coruña

    2

    0

     Colo-Colo

    La Coruña

    10.04.27

    Deportivo de La Coruña

    2

    2

     Colo-Colo

    La Coruña


    Portugal

    13.04.27

    Oporto /Salgueiros

    2

    1

     Colo-Colo

    Porto

    15.04.27

    Sporting /Benfica

    2

    4

     Colo-Colo

    Lisbon

    17.04.27

    Vitória Setúbal

    2

    1

     Colo-Colo

    Lisbon


    Spain

    24.04.27

    Atlético

    3

    1

     Colo-Colo

    Madrid

    01.05.27

    Real Unión Deportiva

    2

    6

     Colo-Colo

    Valladolid

    02.05.27

    Real Unión Deportiva

    3

    3

     Colo-Colo

    Valladolid

    08.05.27

    Valencia C.F.

    3

    4

     Colo-Colo

    Valencia

    09.05.27

    Valencia C.F.

    3

    1

     Colo-Colo

    Valencia

    13.05.27

    Valencia Select

    2

    4

     Colo-Colo

    Valencia

    15.05.27

    Club Deportivo Castellón

    2

    1

     Colo-Colo

    Castellón

    17.05.27

    Puerto de Sagunto

    0

    1

     Colo-Colo

    Sagunto

    22.05.27

    Madrid Select

    1

    3

     Colo-Colo

    Madrid

    27.05.27

    Real Murcia

    4

    1

     Colo-Colo

    Murcia

    29.05.27

    Real Murcia

    2

    4

     Colo-Colo

    Murcia

    31.05.27

    Murcia Select

    2

    4

     Colo-Colo

    Murcia

    05.06.27

    Elche

    2

    2

     Colo-Colo

    Elche

    09.06.27

    Catalunya

    4

    5

     Colo-Colo

    Barcelona

    12.06.27

    Real Sociedad Alfonso XIII

    2

    5

     Colo-Colo

    Palma

    14.06.27

    Real Sociedad Alfonso XIII

    2

    3

     Colo-Colo

    Palma


    Uruguay

    04.07.27

    Uruguay Select

    5

    1

     Colo-Colo

    Montevideo

    07.07.27

    Uruguay Select

    4

    0

     Colo-Colo

    Montevideo

    10.07.27

    Peñarol

    6

    1

     Colo-Colo

    Montevideo


    Argentina

    17.07.27

    Boca Juniors

    6

    0

     Colo-Colo

    Buenos Aires


    Chile

    24.07.27

    Unión Española /Audax Italiano

    0

    4

     Colo-Colo

    Santiago




    P

    W

    D

    L

    F

    A

    43

    26

    4

    13

    130

    83



    Vs. Necaxa  

    Front page news as Mexico's Real España beat the tourists 1-0.

    Vs Catalunya at Les Corts

    The tour was marred by a tragedy. In the match with Real Unión on May 2nd David Arellano was involved in an aerial collision with the Spanish centre half ,Hornia . As they landed Homia's knee hit Arellano in the stomach.  Arellano  was stretchered off and taken to hospital, where peritonitis was diagnosed. The condition was inoperable and David Arellano passed away the following day. He was 24 years old.  



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  • 04/06/15--08:25: Jack Thomas
  • Jack Thomas was born in County Durham.
    He played for Brighton and Hove Albion in the Southern League before joining Newcastle United for the 1911-12 season.
    He made one first team appearance, playing at inside right in a 1-1 draw away to Manchester City.
    Thomas then returned to Spennymoor United, the Northern League club where his career began.
    Pretty unremarkable.
    During the 1914-18 War however Jack Thomas was involved in a series of remarkable exploits.
    Captured by the Germans he was involved in attempt to tunnel out of the prison camp. He eventually escaped and made use of a compass smuggled in a cake to return to Britain. He was then sent back to Europe to work as a spy.

    Credit

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  • 04/07/15--13:28: Football In Many Lands







  • Nottingham Evening Post 23.05.30

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  • 04/03/15--08:36: The Great Victory

  • I have seen all the best sides in Football but I have never seen a side that compared to Preston North End at their best. We beat them but I do not pretend for a moment that we deserved to beat them.
    Billy Bassett



    The FA Cup Final, 1888. Preston North End were strong favourites to win the match. From September 1887 to March 17th 1888 they had won every game. On March 17th they had drawn 1-1 with Crewe Alexandra.
     In the eyes of  the FA president and match referee Major Marindin Preston North End were a Bad Thing- he disapproved of their supposed reliance on Scottish imports. Now the Preston players incensed him further by asking to have a team photograph with the cup before the match. 
    Anecdotally West Bromwich Albion players refused to bet with their Preston North End counterparts on the outcome of the match. The team featured the majority of the players that would go on to feature in the Invincibles squad the following season. Add to that impressive pool of talent the name of  Nick Ross, probably the best defender of his era.

    West Bromwich Albion
    Preston North End
    Bob Roberts
    GK
    R.H Mills-Roberts
    Albert Aldridge
    RB
    Bob Howarth
    Harry Green
    LD
    Nick Ross*
    Ezra Horton
    RH
    Bob Holmes
    Charlie Perry
    CH
    David Russell*
    George Timmins
    LH
    Johnny Graham*
    George Woodhall
    OR
    Jack Gordon*
    Billy Bassett
    IR
    Jimmy Ross*
    Jem Bayliss
    CF
    John Goodall
    Joe Wilson
    IL
    Fred Dewhurst 
    Tom Pearson
    OL
    George Drummond*

    * Scottish players. Mills-Roberts was Welsh. Mills-Roberts and Dewhurst were amateurs. The majority of the  West Bromwich players  were born in that town, with others from nearby Walsall, Tipton and Handsworth. 

    Contemporary reports condemn the Preston forwards for their profligacy. Each of the 5 North End forwards was guilty of at least one serious error in front of goal, and Nick Ross was reported as having said at half time 'our forwards will cost us this match',

    Preston North End

    Bayliss put Albion ahead in the 20th minute, shooting home from a Bassett cross. Dewhurst equalised in a scramble 7 minutes into the second half, and after Jimmy Ross had hit the post West Brom got a winner with just over 10 minutes left to play. 
    Modern references credit the winning goal to Woodhall, but most contemporary
    newspaper reports I have read give the winning goal to Bayliss, heading in after Woodhall had shot against the post. Another account has a shot by Woodhall being deflected in off Bassett's knee. The Birmingham Daily Post infers that Woodhall was responsible for the goal.  Such was life before the action replay.

    Bayliss

    Woodhall

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    Khabarovsk is 7,000 kilometers east of Moscow, just 30 km from the border with the People's Republic of China.  This is the Metallist Khabarovsk team of 1927. Notice they wear striped shorts- very unusual in any era.

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    College Melle

    Royal Antwerp were formed in about 1880 by British expatriates and the Koninklijke Belgische Voetbalbond was established in 1895. Football had first arrived in Belgium in 1863. One football, a leather ball, a luxury item, was taken to The College of the Josephite Fathers at Melle by Cyril Bernard Morrogh . Morrogh was a young student from Ireland. Apparently it was his English classmates who showed most enthusiasm for the game. How closely their activities adhered to the Association Laws of the Game we will never know. Very little, I suspect. 
    The information, illustration and post title are taken from Kroniek van het Belgisch Voetball (Fraiponts & Willcox, 2003)


    Not the actual ball. This one dates from the 1880s

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  • 04/07/15--13:28: Football In Many Lands







  • Nottingham Evening Post 23.05.30

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  • 04/08/15--13:39: English High School AC
  • Alexander Watson Hutton
    When the Scottish educationalist Alexander Watson Hutton became aware that the Saint Andrew's Scots School (Buenos Aires) of which he was director, had insufficient funds to promote sporting activities he resigned and established his own institution - The Buenos Aires English High School.
    Watson Hutton was such a strong believer in the importance of sports in education that he even 'imported' a Scottish football coach- a certain William Watters of whom I can find no further information. The claim that Watters brought the first footballs to Argentina is spurious, as games were played as early as the 1860s 

     In February 1893, Watson Hutton was responsible for the foundation of a second incarnation of The Argentine Association Football League.
    English High School won its first title in 1900. That year also saw English High School awarded the Herald Trophy. This was an award by the Buenos Aires Herald newspaper based on a readers' vote for the most popular team in Buenos Aires.
    The result was :
    English High School AC - 6,942 votes
    Quilmes - 3,467 votes
    Belgrano Athletic - 3,358

    In 1901 the Association rules were changed- it was stipulated that teams must not have the names of schools. Consequently the club members chose a new name- Alumni AC (alumni is Latin for former pupils).

    Alumni dominated Argentinian club football for the following decade. 




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    In the first ever season of the Football League John Goodall was the leading scorer, with 20 goals in 21 games for Preston North End.
    He scored 2 hat tricks


    Jimmy Ross was Preston's next highest scorer, with 19 goals in 21 games.

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